Microsoft accidentally leaks its upcoming social project

first_imgYou can’t expect Facebook and Google to get into a social war without Microsoft wanting in on the action too, can you? This morning, Microsoft claims they unintentionally leaked their own upcoming social platform, codenamed “Tulalip.” The image above is a view of the teaser page that was “accidentally” published on Socl.com, a URL that Microsoft owns.“Tulalip” is actually the name of a Native American tribe that lives near Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Washington, so it makes sense that the entire project may retain its name even as it goes public. Still, it would be difficult to see Microsoft launching a social network with such an esoteric name – especially when there’s rumor that Microsoft may have paid up to $2.6 million for the domain Social.com.If you visit Socl.com now, you get an all-text splash page that says that the project is “an internal design project by Microsoft Research which was accidentally posted to the Web.” It goes on to say “We didn’t mean to, honest.”That may be true, but it does raise questions about what Microsoft is planning to do in the social space – and before the project was “accidentally” published and now nonchalantly dismissed, we had no idea Microsoft was planning anything.Now, at least, we know that they’re working on a service that will allow users to share content with one another, and that Bing will probably play a significant role, since search is present on the login page. We also know that Microsoft will likely offload authentication to Facebook and Twitter, meaning that whatever Tulalip is, it’ll be a companion service to a user’s existing networks, as opposed to a replacement for them.The whole thing seems a little bit like Microsoft Vine, which was a social service that never really found its footing or purpose. Microsoft eventually admitted defeat with Vine and shuttered the project, but the company clearly isn’t finished with social yet. We’ll just have to wait and see if Tulalip becomes reality.Read more at Socl.com, via TechCrunchlast_img read more