San Diego City Council Votes to Limit and Regulate ShortTerm Vacation Rentals

first_img Ashlie Rodriguez, Sampson Ochotorena San Diego City Council Votes to Limit and Regulate Short-Term Vacation Rentals Ashlie Rodriguez, Sampson Ochotorena, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – After years of heated debate, the San Diego City Council established new rules and regulations Monday regarding short term vacation rentals. The council voted 6-3 in favor of a plan that limits how many homes you can put on websites such as AirBnB.By passing the plan, council created the City’s first license-based system to manage short-term rentals. A homeowner who chooses to rent out their home will only be given one license, because the new rules mean homeowners can only rent out their primary home, or, the home they live in. They can apply for one additional license for a dwelling unit on the same parcel as the their primary residence. This means people who buy homes with the intent to rent them out for short-term vacation rentals will no longer be able to do so.Council is also charging cost-recoverable fees to administer licenses and enforce code violations; establish a “Good Neighbor” policy to preserve neighborhood quality of life; hire additional staff to respond to complaints about nuisance properties; and implement a per-night fee that would generate funding for affordable housing projects.“We allowed people to rent out a room in their house on an unlimited basis to make ends meet,” said District 1 Councilmember Barbara Bry. “We allowed them to rent out their whole house on a short-term basis up to six times a year. What we did as we have prevented investors from buying up homes in single family neighborhoods and turning them into mini-hotels.”She and Councilmember Lori Zapf argue neighborhoods are filling with strangers, and San Diego is losing its sense of community. They also say the uptick in investment properties mean there are fewer homes on the market for San Diego resident who actually need to live here full time, and the housing shortage makes the rent go higher for residents as well.The only members of council to vote against the amended plan was Chris Cate, David Alvarez and Scott Sherman, who argued the property rights of residents were being violated by the new rules. He argues council’s new rules just stole many residents’ means of income. Sherman, who represents District 7 believes the issue will go to court.“People’s complaints are noise, people staying up late,” Sherman said. “I’ve got month-to-month renters that are keeping people awake, people who own who are keeping people awake. So what are they going to do next, ban month-to-month renters? Where does the government stop telling everyone else what to do with their lives?”Council estimates it will take one year to get the new system up and running and enforce these new rules.All hosts are required to:Register with or be licensed annually by the CitySecure a Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) certificatePay TOT and the Affordable Housing Impact fees monthlyObtain a Neighborhood Use Permit for dwellings with four or more bedroomsAdvertise a STRO license number on all advertisementsComply with “Good Neighbor” policy, including posting local contact information on propertyCollect and maintain detailed records on each STRO transaction for a period of three yearsAll platforms are required to:Provide notice of the STRO and TOT requirements to each host prior to their listingCollect TOT and Affordable Housing Impact fees at the same time rent is collectedEnsure only licensed or registered hosts are using the booking service on the hosting platformCollect and maintain detailed records on each STRO transaction for a period of three yearsENFORCEMENT, COMPLIANCE AND NEW ONLINE TOOL FOR COMPLAINTSMayor Faulconer is committed to active enforcement to ensure hosts, guests and online platforms for short-term rentals are in compliance with the new regulations. That includes a new team of police and code enforcement officers to work evenings and weekends to address code complaints; the creation of a license and registration system that interfaces with City databases; and a new complaint hotline or mobile application for residents to report violations.Enforcement is based on an inter-departmental strategy that includes the Code Enforcement Division, the City Treasurer’s Office, the City Attorney’s Office and the San Diego Police Department (SDPD).The enforcement program will:Maintain a database of all licensed or registered STRO locations within the City Treasurer’s Office that will provide information to the SDPD.Issue notices of violations, administrative citations, fines and revocation of licenses.Create a STRO Code Enforcement, SDPD and City Attorney team for proactive enforcement in the areas with most frequent violations. The team will work evenings and weekends to target disturbances.Monitor websites to ensure hosts are paying TOT; violators will be reported to the City Attorney.Receive complaint calls 24-hours per day, seven days per week; an online portal will be created to report violations.First notice of violation is considered a “warning”Second notice of violation may result in citationThird notice of violation within 12-month period may result in revocation of STRO permitSUPPORTING AFFORDABLE HOUSINGThe proposal also includes a new Affordable Housing Impact Fee of $2.73 (home share) to $3.96 (whole home) per rental night, paid for by hosts. Implementation of the fee is expected to generate funding for the Affordable Housing Fund, which is administered by the San Diego Housing Commission and is used to pay for affordable housing-related projects. Posted: July 17, 2018 UPDATE: (5:00 PM 7/17/18) – Mayor Kevin Faulconer spoke out after the City Council voted against his short-term rental property plan. center_img Updated: 6:53 PM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings July 17, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics FacebookTwitterlast_img read more