Rugby Book Review – For Poulton and England

first_imgGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the May 2010 issue of Rugby World MagazineDo you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipc LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Our Ronnie: Poulton (middle of front row) as England captain in 1914I don’t want to be killed yet: there is such a lot I wanted to do, or try anyhow,” Ronnie Poulton confided to a friend shortly before he was fatally shot by a sniper on 2 May 1915 on a Belgian battlefield. Thus the 25-year-old joined the ranks of the slaughtered, one of 26 English internationals to do so in World War One. None was more mourned, for Poulton was not only one of the all-time greats of our game but a tireless champion of the underprivileged, writes Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey.His swerves and feints – “It’s no use looking at his head or body, for they seem to go in opposite directions to his legs,” wrote one observer – led to some electric runs on the rugby pitch a century ago, and gave added impetus to the innovative back-line tactics developed by Adrian Stoop at Harlequins. Poulton scored five tries in the 1909 Varsity Match, played a part in the first try ever seen at Twickenham, and scored a stunning try against the 1913 Springboks in a match that elevated him to superstar status. At 24 he captained England to a Grand Slam, marking his 17th Test with four tries against France in the final International played before the outbreak of war.Author James Corsan has followed Poulton’s footsteps from Rugby School to Oxford University to the world-leading biscuit factory that was to have been his empire. His is a poignant portrait. At school Poulton played with Rupert Brooke, later to gain fame for his war poetry. In 1915, Rugby School held a joint memorial service after both were killed within a fortnight of each other.Poulton, says Corsan, had a genius for both rugby and for enhancing the lives of others. “It was his special privilege that on a rugby field he could do both.”RW RATING 4/5BUY IT AT:  www.troubador.co.uk/shop RRP:  £15  PUBLISHED BY:  Troubadorcenter_img Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.last_img read more

Summer tours: All Blacks set to end Philippe Saint-Andre’s terrible year

first_imgFrance XV: Dulin; Huget, Fofana, Fritz, Andreu; Talès, Doussain; Chouly, Claassen, Dusautoir (cap.) ; Maestri, Flanquart ; Mas, Kayser, Domingo.Bench: Szarzewski, Ben Arous, Ducalcon, Vahaamahina, Le Roux, Machenaud, Lopez, Bastareaud. Lost after the losses: Philippe Saint-Andre cuts a miserable figure as he considers his chances against the All BlacksBy Gavin MortimerIT’S NOT much fun being a French fan at the moment. Humiliated last Saturday against the All Blacks, France have already lost the three Test series and are playing for their reputation on Saturday in the final match of the rubber. Coming on the back of a Six Nations wooden spoon, 2013 has been an annus horribilis for Les Bleus and in particular for coach Philippe Saint-Andre.Hard to believe the former Gloucester and Sale Sharks coach ended 2012 full of bonhomie after a trio of autumn internationals that had seen France beat Australia, Argentina and Samoa.Crocked: Injury ended Michalak’s runSo what’s gone wrong? How could a squad that thrashed Australia 33-6 (seven days before the Wallabies beat England at Twickenham) slump to a 33-0 defeat to New Zealand last week, the first time France have finished a Test pointless since a 21-0 drubbing to Scotland in the 1990 Five Nations.The truth is that France are a good team poorly coached and even more poorly selected. For the evidence, look no further than the starting XV selected for Saturday’s third Test in New Plymouth.Saint-Andre has made eight changes. Among those missing from last week’s Christchurch catastrophe are fly-half Frederic Michalak and No8 Louis Picamoles, the pair now back in France nursing injuries.Wearing the No10 shirt on Saturday will be Remi Talès, the Castres No10, while his club team-mate Antonie Claassen is chosen to fill Picamoles’ boots. Frankly, both should have started the second Test. Along with scrum-half Rory Kockott, the pair were instrumental in guiding Castres to their first Top 14 title since 1993. Claassen in particular has been in the form of his life, and his greater dynamism and footballing skills are better suited to an All Blacks encounter than the more powerful but more ponderous style of Picamoles.Claassen didn’t even make the bench for the second Test while Talès only came on as a replacement for the last 16 minutes. Yet Michalak was atrocious last week, a player shorn of self-belief and destitute of decisiveness. It was painful to watch, as it was during the Six Nations when Saint-Andre insisted on selecting Michalak at 10 despite one wretched performance after another.Talès is the third France fly-half in three Tests, following on from the young Camille Lopez in the first match, and Michalak in the second. It’s a stark illustration of the confusion that has increasingly marked Saint-Andre’s tenure in charge of the national team. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Witness too the treatment of flanker Bernard Le Roux. Superb in the midweek win over the Auckland Blues, the Racing Metro loose forward acquitted himself well last week on his international debut in difficult circumstances. His reward? Relegation to the bench. Perhaps Saint-Andre didn’t feel he could have two South African-born players in his back row, or perhaps it’s just another indication that the affable Saint-Andre has lost the plot, in much the same way as his predecessor did.Remember when Marc Lievremont began selecting Morgan Parra as his fly-half during the 2011 World Cup? It was just after he grew a moustache and began giving increasingly bizarre press conferences.Another heavy defeat on Saturday and Saint-Andre might be headed for the funny farm, although in all likelihood he’ll be headed towards the job centre. He’s had 18 months to work his magic with the French squad, and yet the squad looks disorganised and disheartened. Defeat on Saturday will leave France with a 2013 record of played seven, lost five and drawn one, with just a solitary victory versus Scotland.Unimpressed: Guy Noves has been vocal in his criticismsIn his defence, Saint-Andre points to the number of foreigners in the Top 14, claiming there are a dwindling pool of players from which to select a squad. There is a touch of validity to his argument, but the fact remains there is a lot of top-class talent in the French squad and Saint-Andre is not bringing it out. Let’s not forget he insisted on playing Wesley Fofana on the wing for the first year of his reign, a crazy decision from a coach whose reign is fast descending into chaos.If Saint-Andre is given the chop in the wake of the New Zealand debacle, who might replace him? Fabien Galthie the former France captain and now coach of Montpellier has been mooted as a possible successor, but don’t rule out Guy Noves.The Toulouse coach gave an interesting interview to a French Sunday paper last weekend. Aside from praising the performance of Le Roux and reiterating his belief that Michalak is a scrum-half, not a fly-half, Noves criticised France for their inability to react to the New Zealand game plan.  Was the wily old campaigner manoeuvring himself into position, ready to assume power the moment the guillotine falls on Saint-Andre? Last month in an interview with Midi Olympique, Noves was bemoaning the fact Toulouse are struggling to keep up with the likes of Toulon and Clermont in the transfer market.It could be a cri de coeur from a coach now ready for a new challenge. Toulouse’s head coach Guy Noves looks on during the French Top 14 semifinal rugby union match between Toulon and Toulouse on May 24, 2013, at the Beaujoire stadium in Nantes, western France. AFP PHOTO / JEAN-SEBASTIEN EVRARD (Photo credit should read JEAN-SEBASTIEN EVRARD/AFP/Getty Images) last_img read more

Brexit: what would it mean for rugby?

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby World examines the possible outcomes should the UK vote to leave the EU next month This summer’s tours reach their climax on Saturday 25 June, but two days earlier it will be politicians rather than rugby fans eagerly awaiting a result.The people of Britain head to the polls on 23 June to vote in the referendum to decide whether the UK should remain part of the European Union. We’ve all seen the headlines about the impact Brexit (should the UK vote to leave) could have on security, trade and so on, but Rugby World has decided to look at what it could mean for rugby, and particularly overseas signings, on these shores.How things work nowThere are three ways overseas players looking to join a club in the UK can get a work permit to play here professionally:They or their spouse/long-term partner have an EU passport. This includes those who have a parent born in the UK as that qualifies them for a UK passport – Gareth Anscombe, whose mother was born in Wales, for example.Welsh blood: Gareth Anscombe’s mum, Tracy, was born in Cardiff. Photo: Getty ImagesThey or their spouse/long-term partner have a grandparent who was born in the UK, which qualifies them for a five-year ancestry visa. This is how Jimmy Gopperth came over when he joined Newcastle.They have started at least one Test in the previous 15 months for either a Tier One or Tier Two country that is not part of the EU – New Zealand or Georgia for example. For players from outside the top two tiers, the player must have played a minimum of ten Internationals and started at least one Test in the previous 15 months. They need to meet these requirements to be endorsed by the governing body (RFU, SRU or WRU) of the club offering the contract, which makes them eligible for a Tier 2 Sportsperson (long-term deal) or Tier 5 (maximum 12-month deal) work visa.It is also worth noting that just as players from the EU and European Economic Area (EEA), which includes Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway, all have equal rights, those from a number of other countries cannot be discriminated against due to the Cotonou Agreement.This is a treaty between the EU and Africa, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP countries). Without going into the details of the agreement itself, the important thing to note from a rugby perspective is that countries like South Africa, Namibia, Fiji, Samoa and Tonga are part of it. Therefore rugby players from those countries are treated the same as those from the UK and the EU. Therefore they do not count as a ‘foreign player’ when named in a squad.Bok in: South African Schalk Burger joins Saracens next season and will be classed as a ‘non-foreign player’ under the Cotonou ruling. Photo: Getty ImagesThe Aviva Premiership, Guinness Pro12 and European competitions have a limit of just two foreign players in a match-day 23. These could be, say, a Canadian or a New Zealander without an EU passport, while a Fijian would count as a ‘non-foreign player’ because he falls under the Cotonou umbrella.What could change?Even if the UK were to vote to leave the EU there are still a number of unknowns. It would take two years to leave the Union for a start, so it’s not as if any changes would be made before the start of next season.Then it will depend which agreements the Government decides to sign up to. Norway, for example, is not part of the EU but is part of the EEA. To be part of the EEA a country has to join the European Free Trade Association and that means they would also be bound by EU laws concerning free movement. It seems that much of the Brexit debate is still up in the air as so little is known of what the UK’s relationship with Europe would look like should the vote on 23 June fall in favour of the leave campaign. Still, as with all areas of the debate, the possible ramifications for rugby provide food for thought.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img Alternatively, the UK could negotiate a bilateral trade agreement where they would keep access to the free market and bypass some EU laws – how easy this would be is at the heart of the stay/leave argument.Channel crosser: Montpellier’s Akapusi Qera played for Gloucester before moving to France. Photo: Getty ImagesIf there wasn’t free movement, it would mean players arriving from overseas would now need a UK passport rather than one from any EU country and European players without a UK passport would need to fulfil the same requirements as other foreign players in terms of playing at least one Test in the past 15 months.Let’s imagine the UK has not been part of the EU for a few years and apply those rules to a couple of recent signings. Louis Picamoles would still fit the brief for Northampton given that he’s played for France this season but Italy-born prop Derrick Appiah, who joined Worcester in February 2015, would not have been able to make the move because he has not played for Italy at Test level.Of most significance, however, is the foreign player ruling. If teams continued to be limited to just two foreign players in their match-day 23s, there would be significant changes to squads. EU and Cotonou Agreement players would no longer be classed as ‘non-foreign’ players so clubs would be more likely to sign UK players than a Pacific Islander, for example. There simply wouldn’t be room in squads for more than a handful of overseas signings because they couldn’t all be selected each week.As for the movement of players to France, this wouldn’t change – apart from a little more paperwork! If a player is offered a contract with a French club it comes with a work permit – if they are good enough to be given a deal, they are deemed worthy of a work permit. So while players in the UK wanting to move to France would now have to fill out the same forms as, say, a New Zealander rather than a more seamless move enabled under EU regulations, there would be no barriers to such a switch.In or out? Boris Johnson, here with the Webb Ellis Cup, is in favour of leaving the EU. Photo: Getty ImagesSo if Britain left the EU, would overseas players be even more likely to head to France than the UK? Possibly. And that would certainly be a concern for clubs in terms of being competitive in the European competitions. Could it hurt the progress of the Pacific Islands teams as less spots would be available in the squads of UK clubs? Maybe. In contrast, it could also lead to the development of more homegrown talent.However, it should also be said that the rule concerning two foreign players in a match-day 23 is governed by the competitions themselves so the RFU, EPCR and so on could easily amend it to take into consideration the change in status of those who currently fall under the EU and Cotonou umbrellas. Kiss or split? An England and a France fan get close during the Six Nations. Photo: Getty Images last_img read more

Scarlets and Wales centre Jonathan Davies

first_imgScarlets and Wales centre Jonathan Davies talks pub classics and wrestling his brother in this offbeat Q&A On the ball: Jonathan Davies is a world-class centre (Huw Evans Agency) Downtime with Scarlets and Wales centre Jonathan DaviesWho would you like to be stuck in a lift with?Someone entertaining. I like listening to Joe Rogan’s podcast. He’s a comedian, talks about MMA and does Fear Factor, an American TV show. I think he’d be entertaining.What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?Martyn Williams told me the Champagne doesn’t get handed out on Tuesdays. It’s about preparing well, but you’ve got to be ready to go come match day.What does the Wales shirt mean to you?It’s the history that has been in the jersey beforehand – you’ve grown up with it. I was taken as a young kid to watch Wales play and wore my jersey with huge pride. You think about the people who have worn the jersey and how you have a responsibility to it – you don’t want to do it an injustice. There’s pressure that comes with it.When I come back in (to the changing room) after the warm-up, I look at the jersey and have a quick think about those people who are important to myself and my family, and that putsme in a good place before the game.If the shirt fits… Jonathan Davies models the Wales jersey (Huw Evans Agency)What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch?This will have to be to do with Lou Reed. I’ve heard him barking at people. He and Bradley Davies come up with stuff together.Who are the jokers with Wales and Scarlets?Rob Evans is one. My brother (James) thinks he’s a joker and tries to be a joker. They go a long way to being the main jokers in the team.What about practical jokes? It’s generally just scaring people. You’ve always got to be on your guard and watch around corners. It’s a brilliant atmosphere to be part of and we’re very lucky with that at Scarlets. We know when to work and when it’s time to have a good laugh. That comes across on the field as well.Do you have any phobias?Obviously snakes and spiders. Spiders in the house are fine, it’s the big things you see outside.If you could be one of your team-mates, who would it be?Leigh Halfpenny – he’s got the biggest bank account!What are your bugbears?Having no manners really annoys me. I was taught by my mum and dad to say please and thank you, so I pick up on manners. If you could have one superpower, what would it be?To fly. That would be pretty cool. I love Barbados so could go there.Who would be your three dream guests at a dinner party?Tom Brady – I love how he’s been able to stay at the top for so long. He was the 199th NFL Draft pick and became the greatest player ever to play American Football. And I support the Patriots.NFL star: Tom Brady in action for the New England Patriots (Getty Images)Mark Wahlberg – I imagine he’d have cool stories from back in the day and in Hollywood. And Emilia Clarke – ‘Mother of Dragons’ from Game of Thrones.What’s the silliest thing you’ve bought? When I was younger I ordered a Patriots jersey, with my name on the back, from America. I thought it would be fine, about £20, but it was more than £100 to get it imported. I was about 12 and my dad made sure I learnt my lesson.What’s the best photo on your phone? I’ve got one of me and Sir Alex Ferguson at Cheltenham. I sent it to my brother and he said: “F-off”!My brother and I have season tickets at Man U, so Ryan Giggs knowing my name was great and meeting Sir Alex was another level again.Tell us the Ryan Giggs story…When we played England in 2014 at Twickenham, Michael Carrick and Rio Ferdinand were there and went into the England changing room, then Ryan Giggs came into ours. He knew my name – I was like a kid at Christmas!What would be your specialist subject on Mastermind?WWF/WWE from 1996-2003. Me and my brother spent a lot of time watching wrestling videos when we were younger. We lived above a pub and would make such a racket wrestlingthat the people downstairs eating dinner would hear us sparring.What’s your guilty pleasure?Food-wise, I love chocolate, but my guilty pleasure is Tina Turner. I like Steamy Windows and I Can’t Stand the Rain. Growing up in a pub, there was a jukebox so on Saturday nights there would be a lot of Tina Turner and Queen – Queen isn’t a guilty pleasure.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby?Employment. Mum would be happy!center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the December 2018 edition of Rugby World. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Elinor Snowsill on rugby’s transformative effects

first_imgWhen I was in school, kids would put tomboys back in their box by calling them a lesbian. It definitely had an impact on how I felt about myself and is probably the reason I took so long – I was 23 – to come out to friends and family.Does coming out still have to be a thing? In my world it doesn’t but I was asked to do a documentary for S4C when there’d been a few homophobic attacks across the UK and I’d heard about a couple of people who were struggling to come out to their family. If I could make a difference in people’s attitudes that would be great.From a results perspective, Wales are not in great shape. But if you saw what we’re doing behind the scenes, it’s exciting. We lost all our games in the Six Nations, but parts of the rugby we played are the best I’ve been involved in.I’m excited to see where we are come the 2021 World Cup. I think this will be the best World Cup ever. I’ve been lucky to play in other World Cups and it’s a real privilege. This one will be totally different because it’s on the other side of the world in New Zealand. The furthest I’ve been for a World Cup before is Paris! This article originally appeared in the June 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The Wales fly-half discusses her work with School of Hard Knocks and her hopes for the future of the women’s game LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS I’d like to set up a private school for kids like the ones I work with to come to free. They could stay at the school all week because for some kids home can be a toxic environment and the reason they struggle to behave. If you take them out of that environment, you can work closely with them. It’s an idea at the moment, but if anyone wants to fund it get in touch!I’d love to be a high-level head coach one day. With a women’s team, because I understand girls a bit more. I’ve done my Level One course and I’m working with the WRU to get more badges.It’s really important to have more female coaches in the game. It’s an opportunity for retired players to help inspire the next generation. There was only one female in the (Women’s) Six Nations coaching teams. It shows how much we need to push our recruitment on.The next step is realising we’re not mini men, we’re women. It’s an exciting time to be part of sport and looking at what works for women rather than just replicating what men do. Since the story about Chelsea FC (planning training around menstrual cycles), there’s been a lot more talk around it. We (Wales Women) have a female general manager, Charly Wathan, and I think she’d implement something like that.center_img There’s always a reason behind behaviour and I do one-on-one mentoring to find out what’s going on. I’m in my third year with SOHK and now do five days a week.The school identifies a group they want us to work with – most of mine are girls in Years Eight and Nine. The first hour is on personal development. We have a loose curriculum but it depends on their needs. One group were fighting a lot so we did a session on ‘One punch, one kill’. The second hour is rugby training and we also take them on trips to play other SOHK teams.Not many sports can be as effective as rugby at changing behaviour. Firstly, respect is huge and that’s something we instil in the kids. It’s not just respecting the ref but coaches, team-mates…The second thing is the power of the team; how we build them together to make the SOHK team, earning the kit and being part of it.Rugby wouldn’t be as successful if it wasn’t a contact sport. The physical aspect, the contact part, is the third thing. It’s that ability to be physical but not be told off for it. Instead of fighting, kids can learn to put in a big tackle and the rewards of that. They learn how to channel their aggression. Elinor Snowsill on rugby’s transformative effects Last year Elinor Snowsill was going viral for a behind-the-back kick while playing for the Barbarians against the USA. That may not have led to a change in tactics, but the Wales fly-half is aware of rugby’s ability to change lives. Here she explains more…I’m lead coach for the School of Hard Knocks schools programme in Wales. There are two different programmes. The adult one is an eight-week intensive course and focuses on getting people back into work or education. Then they decided to have a preventative programme in schools.I turned down a really good job to work one day a week with SOHK. I was going to teach A Level psychology but the WRU asked if I’d be interested in doing coaching with SOHK. I went to see what they did and fell in love with it – it’s the perfect job for me. It’s rugby and challenging behaviour. Calling the shots: Elinor Snowsill directs play for Wales (Getty Images) last_img read more

¿Debe exigirse la confirmación?

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Mark M. Beckwith, el obispo de Newark, en el momento de imponer las manos durante un oficio de confirmación en la iglesia episcopal de San Jorge [St. George’s] en Maplewood, Nueva Jersey. Foto/Iglesia episcopal de San Jorge.[Episcopal News Service] Cuando la Rda. Canóniga Lee Alison Crawford le dijo a los miembros de la junta parroquial que los cánones exigían que se confirmaran, un angustiado guardián menor renunció.“Como (ex) rectora de una congregación cuya asistencia promedio el domingo estaba por debajo de 50, lo cual me daba un grupo esencial de unas 30 personas, solía descubrir por accidente que alguien no había sido confirmado”, recordaba Crawford, durante una entrevista telefónica reciente.Ella no le aceptó la renuncia. “Le dije, tú eres una de las personas más fieles que conozco. Ya tienes una posición de liderazgo. Entiendes la iglesia. En una pequeña congregación  yo diría que la confirmación de sus líderes es algo ideal, pero la teoría y la práctica no siempre coinciden”, dijo Crawford, diputada a la Convención General por Vermont.“Con el cambio en la teología del libro de oración de 1979, que afirma el bautismo como la raíz de todo lo que hacemos, la confirmación es un rito en busca de una teología”, agregó ella.El requisito de la confirmación para el liderazgo fue tema de un intenso debate en la 77ª. Convención General en Indianápolis, pero no se logró mucho consenso, dijo Deborah Stokes, diputada laica por la Diócesis de Ohio Sur.En última instancia, la Convención General rechazó o remitió a ulteriores conversaciones, varias resoluciones que propusieron la eliminación (A042, A043) o la revisión (A044) de la confirmación como requisito para el liderazgo de la Iglesia.“Tenemos la profunda convicción de que esto es sólo el inicio del diálogo”, dijo Stokes, copresidenta del comité legislativo de instrucción, que estudió las resoluciones. “No quería perder la confirmación, y creo que todos nosotros temíamos perderla si deja de ser un requisito para algo”.Más que eliminarla, los cambios propuestos intentaban “liberar la confirmación de ser una respuesta al bautismo, una respuesta pastoral que podría ocurrir de varias maneras en las vidas de la gente”, dijo la Rda. Ruth Meyers, profesora de la cátedra Hodges-Haynes de Liturgia en el Seminario Teológico del Pacífico, y quien consultó con la Comisión Permanente sobre la Formación Cristiana de Por Vida (SCLCF por su sigla en inglés), que fue la autora de las resoluciones.Ella se sorprendió por la reacción a los cambios propuestos. “La gente tenía la sensación de que , sacándola de los Cánones, queríamos deshacernos de la confirmación. Lo cual no era así en modo alguno”.Los cambios canónicos pretendían más bien ofrecer opciones. “Podríamos decir que el bautismo, con alguna instrucción en la historia y gobierno de la Iglesia, es realmente lo que necesitas para el liderazgo”, dejando que la confirmación sigua siendo “una respuesta al bautismo en el momento en que tenga sentido para ti”.El obispo Porter Taylor, de Carolina del Norte Occidental y vicepresidente de la SCLCF, dijo que los cambios harían del rito más una respuesta a la acción del Espíritu Santo y menos “un aro por el que tengamos que saltar. No veo la confirmación como parte de nuestra estructura de gobierno”.“Y no se trata de decir que quiero ser miembro de la Iglesia Episcopal”, dijo él durante una reciente entrevista telefónica. “Se trata de decir que Dios ha estado operando algo en mi vida y quiero destacar eso presentándome en medio de la congregación y haciendo que el obispo me imponga las manos a fin de resaltar la acción del Espíritu Santo”.Para Lillian Sauceda-Whitney, que fue confirmada el 6 de mayo en la iglesia de Santa Margarita de Escocia [St. Margaret of Scotland] en San Juan Capistrano, California, la confirmación fue como “si hubiera encontrado finalmente mi hogar. Fue como si me bautizaran”.El obispo Stacy Sauls, jefe de operaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal, confirmó a un maestro de preescolar de 59 años y a más de una docena de otras personas en nombre del obispo Jon Bruno de Los Ángeles.“Derramé lágrimas de alegría”, dijo Sauceda-Whitney durante una entrevista telefónica el 23 de agosto. “Realmente quería pertenecer. Pensé, es hora de que dé un paso al frente y diga soy episcopal. Creí que la única manera de hacerlo sería incorporándome a la Iglesia”.Si la confirmación ha de exigirse a los miembros de la Iglesia en general y a sus líderes en particular, ya que no es un requisito necesario para recibir la comunión,  es algo que debe debatirse orgánicamente, en todos los niveles de la Iglesia, especialmente en la parroquia, dijo la Rda. Elizabeth Kaeton, sacerdote retirada de la Diócesis de Newark.“Tiene que ver con pertenecer” dijo Kaeton en una entrevista telefónica hace poco. “Creo que no está aún claro en nuestra sociedad y que eso se refleja en nuestra Iglesia, lo que significa pertenecer. En la Iglesia estamos intentando definir lo que significa ser episcopal. También estamos batallando con lo que significa hacer una pública profesión de fe”.En lugar de estar asociado a un rito de iniciación o a una edad, la confirmación debería vincularse a un proceso de formación”, agregó ella. “Es una conversación apasionante. Hemos dejado de hablar de sexo y ahora estamos hablando de dinero y del bautismo y la confirmación y el matrimonio y éstas son cosas importantes”.Otro miembro del comité de instrucción, el Rdo. Charles Holt, rector de la iglesia de San Pedro [St. Peter’s] en Lake Mary, en Florida Central, dijo que se sintió aliviado y agradecido de que “ninguna de las resoluciones resultara aprobada en la Convención General.De haber sido aprobadas, en teoría “todo lo que uno tenía que hacer para llegar a ser un líder electo en los más altos niveles [de la Iglesia] era haber tomado la comunión tres veces en el curso del último año”, ser un comulgante respetable, agregó. Podría darse el caso que no creyeran en Jesucristo como su Señor y salvador personal y fuesen líderes en la Iglesia Episcopal”.El debate acerca de la confirmación es esencial y saludable porque “nos lleva a comprometernos nuevamente y viene a esclarecer nuestras creencias fundamentales y a batallar con nuestra fe”, afirmó Holt.Él cree también que la confirmación “es actualmente lo único que un obispo puede hacer para ayudar a que la Iglesia Episcopal crezca. En la Iglesia Episcopal, es tarea del obispo cerciorarse de que cada persona en particular que es miembro de nuestra Iglesia ha hecho una madura profesión de fe en Jesucristo” —un momento que él cree que todo cristiano debe experimentar.“Si eliminamos la confirmación privamos a las personas de ese momento”, añadió.Hacer de la confirmación un momento eficaz y personal es de suma importancia para el obispo Dorsey Henderson, que se jubiló de la Diócesis de Alta Carolina del Sur en 2009. En la actualidad asiste al obispo Gregory Brewer de Florida Central en las confirmaciones.Henderson confirmó unas 18 personas en la iglesia de San Pedro el 17 de mayo, entre ellas a Grant Williams, de 13 años y estudiante de 8vo. Grado, quien creen que “la confirmación es muy necesaria.“Sentí como que estaba más cerca de Dios, como que estaba empezando a conocerle mejor y  confirmando mi fe en él al hacer patente que verdaderamente creía en él y quería seguirle”, explicó.Henderson dijo también que apunta los nombres de cada uno confirmando en una libreta personal que ha mantenido a lo largo de sus 15 años de episcopado”. Les aseguro que oraré regularmente por ellos, por sus nombres, y les pido sus oraciones”.Si bien la confirmación “no es esencial para recibir el sacramento de la Santa Comunión… proporciona una especie de estímulo espiritual”, especialmente a los que han sido bautizados de bebés y a los provenientes de otras tradiciones, dijo durante una entrevista telefónica reciente.El obispo Dan Martins, de la Diócesis de Springfield, dijo que la confirmación evolucionó de la manera en que lo hizo debido a una necesidad práctica: porque las diócesis crecieron y “los obispos no podían ser ubicuos”.Lo que comenzó como un oficio que incluía el bautismo seguido por la imposición de manos del obispo y una oración por los dones del Espíritu Santo, con el tiempo “se separó y los sacerdotes fueron autorizados a celebrar el rito del agua, sobreentendiendo que en algún momento llevarían a los recién bautizados ante el obispo para la imposición de manos. Finalmente adquirió vida propia como un evento separado y tomó el nombre de confirmación”, dijo él hace poco en una entrevista por teléfono.El rito puede evolucionar, pero los obispos siguen siendo un símbolo “de la Iglesia en su sentido más amplio, nuestra conexión orgánica con la Iglesia a través del tiempo y del espacio”, añadió. “La oración puede cambiar, el nombre que usamos es cambiante, pero… como signo sacramental del ministerio, es importante, pues, que a todo el mundo el obispo le imponga las manos en algún momento de su profesión pública de fe y discipulado cristianos”.El Rdo. Tom Woodward, sacerdote jubilado que reside en Nuevo México y diputado a la Convención General durante mucho tiempo, cree que el bautismo y la confirmación deben aplazarse, hasta alrededor de los 16 y los 26 años de edad respectivamente, para dejar margen a profesiones de fe más maduras.“Si bautizan a un niño de escuela intermedia o secundaria, sus amigos asistirían a ese oficio y eso sería un testimonio convincente de la decisión de ser bautizado”, dijo él en una entrevista telefónica. “La clase de confirmación incluiría un criterio  del ministerio y de sus dones. Luego, cuando el obispo llega a invocar al Espíritu Santo sería muy semejante al proceso de ordenación, añadiéndole dignidad y fuerza de comisión al ministerio de los laicos en el mundo”.La elección del momento oportuno tuvo que ver absolutamente con la confirmación Karen Lander, de 45 años, y de Henry Lutz, de 14, confirmados también por Sauls en la Iglesia de Santa Margarita, en San Juan Capistrano.“Decidí desde que enviaba a mi hija de ocho años a sus clases de primera comunión, que para mí también era el momento de hacer mi confirmación”, dijo Lander durante una reciente entrevista por teléfono. “Tengo que ser un ejemplo para ella. Necesitaba aprender más acerca de la Iglesia, en lugar de sólo asistir a ella”.Para Lutz, que ingresa en noveno grado este año, fue una experiencia comunal. “El obispo me puso las manos encima, y los sacerdotes y mi familia hicieron lo mismo.“Adquirí conocimiento a través de toda la experiencia. Comprendo lo que hago con la Biblia, lo que puedo interpretar de Dios, y así mismo muchas partes de la Iglesia Episcopal. Lo interpreto como una señal de la manera en que llevo ahora mi fe por un camino diferente, a sabiendas de que tengo una fe más fuerte y me siento dispuesto a hacer más”.— La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Por Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 31, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA ¿Debe exigirse la confirmación? Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rapidísimascenter_img Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Por Onell A. SotoPosted Apr 18, 2014 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH El Consejo Evangélico de Venezuela ha publicado un mensaje pidiendo oraciones a todos sus fieles para que el gobierno de Nicolás Maduro “cumpla con su función de garantizar los derechos civiles de todos los ciudadanos”. El mensaje pide “oraciones y súplicas a Dios por la paz en nuestra nación”, especialmente por las familias que han perdido seres queridos durante las protestas. El Consejo reúne a 2 millones de personas que se congregan en 1500 iglesias a lo largo y ancho del país.Los objetivos del movimiento estudiantil venezolano organizador de las marchas y representados por la Federación de Centros Universitarios son: Libertad para todos los detenidos, cese inmediato de las torturas y violaciones de los derechos humanos, fin de la criminalización de la protesta, desarme de los grupos violentos que se hacen pasar por colectivos comunitarios, renovación y legitimación  de los poderes públicos y cese de la censura de los medios de comunicación.Durante el histórico encuentro entre el régimen y los líderes de la oposición (menos el liderato de los estudiantes) el líder opositor Henrique Capriles confrontó al presidente Nicolás Maduro con las siguientes preguntas: “¿Cómo vas a pedir respeto si tú no respetas? ¿Cómo le pides al país que te acepte, si a la mitad del país le llamas fascista? Es muy difícil gobernar un país con la mitad en contra”. El encuentro fue transmitido por cadena de radio y televisión a todo el país.El martes pasado hubo un segundo encuentro pero el presiente Maduro no asistió y todo se hizo a Puertas Cerradas. A los medios de prensa no se les permitió la entrada. Parece que el gobierno no estuvo contento con los resultados del primer encuentro. “Había mucha información que todo el país desconocía gracias a la censura de los medios, dijo un dirigente opositor. Añadió que en ese sentido el encuentro fue un éxito para la oposición.El presidente Maduro se ha buscado otro enemigo al anunciar que si una aerolínea reduce o suspende sus vuelos a Venezuela “no volverá a volar a este país mientras seamos gobierno”. Por otra parte se informó que Venezuela mantiene una deuda de 300 millones de dólares con las aerolíneas por “operaciones en bolívares que no se han podido convertir en dólares” debido a que en el mercado de cambios en Venezuela está bajo estricto control estatal desde el 2003.El boletín del Centro Anglicano de Roma informa que según cálculos recientes entre 9 y 15 millones de africanos fueron transportados a través del Atlántico en el lucrativo mercado de esclavos hasta 1807 cuando “la trata” fue abolida en el Imperio Británico. Se estima que 4 millones de africanos fueron sometidos a la esclavitud en Estados Unidos hasta 1865 cuando fueron emancipados. Según la Fundación Walk Free en la actualidad hay 29 millones de personas esclavizadas en el mundo. Los países con mayor índice de esclavitud son India, Pakistán, Nigeria, Etiopía, Rusia, Tailandia, la República Democrática del Congo, Myanmar (la antigua Birmania) y Bangladesh.El arzobispo de Cantórbery, Justin Welby, ha elogiado la labor del nuevo patriarca Ignacio Efrén II como sucesor número 123 de San Pedro en la Sede Apostólica de Antioquía y Todo el Este y Cabeza Suprema de la Iglesia Siriaca Ortodoxa. El nuevo patriarca ha hecho una notable contribución en el campo de la historia, la teología y la literatura, dijo Welby. “Esperamos que nuestras relaciones fraternales sean fortalecidas con su presencia”, añadió.José María di Paola, sacerdote católico romano en la Villa La Cárcova de Buenos Aires ha denunciado que las armas y las drogas se han convertido en negocios fuera de control en Argentina y criticó que en el país se esté discutiendo  “si se sube o no la edad de imputabilidad” en vez de ir hacia quienes manejan el tráfico de armas y las drogas.El papa Francisco hablando ante una organización protectora de la niñez dijo que no dará ni un paso atrás ante la acción a tomar contra los sacerdotes pedófilos. “La iglesia está consciente de los daños causados por esos hombres de iglesia. Su delito es un daño personal y moral y debe castigarse con fuerza y valor”, añadió.Los que afirman que ser pastor es una profesión fácil y segura deberían leer los periódicos con calma. No pasa un día en que un sacerdote o un pastor sea secuestrado o asesinado, tanto en América Latina como en otras partes del mundo. Oremos por aquellos que arriesgan sus vidas por llevar el evangelio hasta lo último de la tierra.ORACIÓN: Señor, ten piedad. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Ruby Sales preaches in Jonathan Daniels’ home parish

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Lesley Hildrey says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 23, 2015 Submit a Press Release Bridget Hansel says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Lesley Hildrey says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 John V. Wilmerding says: Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Comments (4) Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Episcopal News Service – Keene, New Hampshire] Fifty years and three days after Jonathan Daniels died in Hayneville, Alabama, by stepping in front of a shotgun aimed at her, Ruby Sales, a human rights activist, said her heart was heavy as she preached in his home parish, St. James Episcopal Church.But she also said she found joy in this year’s commemorations of Daniels’ death, along with renewed hope for the future.“I wonder what Jonathan would make of a world where intimacy has been reduced to a virtual experience” where people talk to each other via smartphones, even bring them to the dinner table, said Sales, who operates the Atlanta, Georgia-based SpiritHouse Project to work for racial, economic and social justice.“The world that Jonathan imagined was a world of intimacy; it created a new intimacy, a stronger intimacy, a new union, a new marriage, between people who never would have met or sat down with each other.”Sales called on the congregation to take up Daniels’ commitment.“This is an opportunity to play a critical role at a critical moment in America’s history,” she said. “It is an opportunity to once again be on the front lines of struggle as the country decides which direction it will go.At the end of Sunday’s Eucharist, the Rev. Judith Upham, a seminary classmate of Daniels’ who went with him to Alabama in the spring of 1965, presented the parish with an award that she said rightly belonged in the Keene church. It was a Martyrs of the Movement award given in Daniels’ memory during a March 29 Palm Sunday “service of reconciliation” at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Selma, Alabama.Members of St. Paul’s, most of whom are white, joined with members of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Birmingham, most of whom are black, and members of Brown Chapel AME Church for the service. In the spring of 1965, an interracial group of Episcopal clergy and lay people, including Daniels and Upham, who had responded to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call to come to Selma in the wake of Bloody Sunday, attempted to worship at the church several times, but were turned away at the door. Those who eventually participated in the first integrated service, held on March 28, 1965, included Daniels, who was murdered by a deputy sheriff in Haynesville five months later, saving Sales’ life.Daniels became a member of St. James in Keene after he moved there from Keene United Church of Christ and St. James was sponsoring his journey towards ordination when he was killed. Neither of Daniels’ parents or his sister is living and so, Upham said, she was asked to accept the Martyrs of the Movement award, deciding to bring it to Keene.Sunday’s Eucharist in Keene, which was followed by a 2.3 “walk of remembrance” to the Daniels’ family gravesite in Monadnock View Cemetery for a service, culminated a year’s worth of events organized by members of St. James Episcopal Church, along with others. On Aug. 22, a commemorative weekend included panel discussions featuring people who knew Daniels followed by an evening screening at Keene’s Colonial Theater of the 1999 nearly hour-long documentary Here Am I, Send Me: The Story of Jonathan Daniels, produced by Keene State College professors Lawrence Benaquist and William Sullivan. The documentary, narrated by actor Sam Waterston, is viewable here.During remarks before the screening, community volunteer Hank Knight read a letter from President Barak Obama in which the president said that the country’s destiny was shaped by “selfless individuals” such as Daniels. Obama wrote that Daniels and other civil rights activists were heroes who embodied patriotism and gave their full measure on the “battlefield of justice.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. August 25, 2015 at 6:30 am The Jonathan Daniels 50th commemoration was a culmination of a series of events throughout the year 2015. Without the support of our community, this would never have happened. Also thanks to the Episcopal News service for their coverage.And yes, there is still work to be done. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Jonathan Daniels Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest August 24, 2015 at 3:28 pm it was truly an honor to have Ruby Sales preach at St. James yesterday. We were also delighted to welcome Dr Gloria Larry House, Jimmy Rogers, Rev Judith Upham and of course Richard Morrisroe, (the guy shot in the back, immediately after Daniels was shot, and hospitalized for 6 months), who were all closely involved with Jonathan Daniels and all played their parts in the Civil Rights Movement.I look forward to seeing the film of these guests in their panel interview with Sandra and Rich Wallace soon too. The Wallaces are writing a book about the life of Jonathan Daniels which will be a very good read, judging by how much they know and how captivating they are when they speak- to come out next year.50 years later but there is still so much work to be done. Black lives matter! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Ruby Sales preaches in Jonathan Daniels’ home parish ‘What would he make of the world today,’ Sales asks, while issuing call to action Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC August 25, 2015 at 11:16 am I agree. Only now am I realizing just how much support and hard work went into all this. Thank you all. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR August 26, 2015 at 4:08 pm Moreover, the vast amount of work yet to be done mostly has to be done by us white people. What would our ‘due diligence’ efforts look like? We’re still finding out, but the Biblical injunction to “seek peace and pursue it” is such a call for zealous diligence. I am working on an anti-racism training for white people … if anyone reads this and is interested, please look me up on Facebook and/or join the page I created there called W.A.R. — Whites Against RacismI am a longtime friend of Ruby’s and a SpiritHouse associate, and was thrilled to hear her deliver this sermon in person! At Jonathan’s graveside, I added a prayer that we be empowered to examine ourselves for any trace or vestige of white racism, saying that complacency could be complicity, and that white complacency is related to the tragedy at Charleston on June 17 of this year. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

Una ‘aldea’ de casitas para indigentes con ayuda de una…

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Tags Poverty & Hunger Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Una ‘aldea’ de casitas para indigentes con ayuda de una iglesia de Montana Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Por David PaulsenPosted Mar 6, 2017 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Una maqueta de la propuesta Primera Aldea de Viviendas muestra un grupo de diminutas casas en torno a un centro comunitario de recursos. Foto de la Escuela de Arquitectura de la Universidad del Estado de Montana.[Episcopal News Service] Una coalición de episcopales, estudiantes de arquitectura y proveedores de servicios sociales en Bozeman, Montana, están en medio de un proyecto innovador que se propone abordar el problema de la indigencia en la ciudad con un espacio de 14 metros cuadrados por unidad.El concepto es una aldea de casas diminutas para indigentes crónicos en torno a un centro comunitario de recursos, donde los residentes podrían recibir consejería, asistencia médica y ayuda para encontrar empleo hasta que puedan mudarse a hogares permanentes. Los organizadores  aún están a la búsqueda de un sitio adecuado, pero la mayoría de las otras piezas del proyecto están cayendo en su lugar mientras otros grupos e individuos de la comunidad respaldan la idea.“De repente, ha surgido esta coalición que se muestra entusiasmada con lo que queremos hacer”, dijo la Rda. Connie Pearson-Campbell, diácona de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James Episcopal Church] en Bozeman, que es una de las fuerzas motrices detrás de la propuesta Primera Aldea de Vivienda.[Housing First Village].Sara Savage, directora de viviendas  en el Consejo de Desarrollo de Recursos Humanitarios, o HRDC [por su sigla en inglés] definió a  Pearson-Campbell como un “huracán de relaciones públicas” en la búsqueda de apoyos para el proyecto. El HRDC, una agencia de acción comunitaria sin fines de lucro, aporta años de experiencia en proporcionarle albergue y servicios a la población indigente de la localidad.La Universidad del Estado de Montana es el tercer actor de esta coalición. La Escuela de Arquitectura creó un curso el otoño pasado en el cual los estudiantes diseñaron las casitas, y cursos subsecuentes ayudarán este año a hacer avanzar el proyecto a través de las fases regulatoria y de construcción.“Nos damos cuenta de que probablemente es cuestión de un par de años, o al menos de un año, antes de que podamos poner las primeras unidades en un sito”, dijo Ralph Johnson, profesor de arquitectura. “Estas cosas no suceden de la noche a la mañana. Pero estamos avanzando más rápidamente que la mayoría de las comunidades” que han intentado llevar a cabo proyectos semejantes.Las casas pequeñitas son una fuerte tendencia en el mundo de la construcción de viviendas y en la cultura popular. Los programas de TV de realidad múltiple han venido a mostrar estos pequeños espacios habitables, suscitando incluso que algunos en la industria de la construcción de casas pequeñas debata si tales programas son buenos o malos para el “movimiento”.En ese contexto, las casitas se ven como una tendencia para reducir el espacio de vivienda, pero algunas comunidades, tales como la de San Jorge [St. George, Utah, y Seattle , han demostrado que estas casas diminutas pueden ser herramientas para llegar a las personas sin hogar o a poblaciones de bajos ingresos.La Iglesia Episcopal cuenta con sus propios ejemplos. La iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James] en la reserva india de Roca Enhiesta [Standing Rock] en Dakota del Norte utilizó una subvención de la Ofrenda Unida de Gracias para construir casitas para estudiantes. Y la iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s Episcopal Church] en St. Cloud, Minnesota, construyó una sola casita para alojar  a una sola persona indigente  en su propiedad.Lo que singulariza a Pearson-Campbell y a la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol es que representan una de las tres patas de las tres que sostienen una misión que se consolidó casi por accidente.Se calcula que cualquier noche dada hay unas 150 personas sin hogar en Bozeman, y un 30 por ciento de las cuales se consideran indigentes crónicos, una situación que a menudo se asocia con la enfermedad metal, el consumo de sustancias estupefacientes y otros problemas personales, explicó Savage. La supervivencia en las calles puede ser precaria, especialmente en los crudos meses del invierno de Montana, y desde 2016 se han reportado seis muertes de indigentes en Bozeman.El HRDC ha estado albergando a unas 10 personas a la vez en un espacio de vivienda transitoria llamado Casa Amos [Amos House], pero se vio obligado a cerrar el local en julio pasado luego de perder una subvención federal. Santiago Apóstol intervino y ofreció un albergue que no usaba propiedad de la iglesia, llamado Canterbury House, lo cual le permitió al HRDC convertirla en vivienda para cuatro mujeres indigentes.“Tengo que decir, que contar con asociados locales de carácter religioso que buscan dentro de sus propios recursos… resultó muy impactante y realmente tuvo una repercusión directa en las mujeres sin hogar en el transcurso de un mes”, dijo Savage.Por separado, dijo Pearson-Campbell, ella le oyó contar el verano pasado a un amigo de un proyecto de casitas diminutas en Detroit, y se dio a la idea de hacer algo semejante para abordar el problema de la indigencia en Bozeman.“Le eché un vistazo a eso y pensé,  cielos, creo que podemos hacer esto en Bozeman”, dijo.Sacó a relucir la idea en una reunión con el director de planificación municipal en agosto. A la salida, dio la casualidad que se encontró con Johnson, el profesor de la Universidad de Montana, que se iba a hablar con el director de planificación sobre otro asunto. Luego de las presentaciones, se creó rápidamente una asociación para [la fabricación] de las casitas.Johnson llevó la idea a la universidad y, con otros dos profesores, creó el curso ese otoño en que 12 estudiantes se dieron a la tarea de diseñar las casitas.“Sabía que en la Escuela de Arquitectura había una sólida ética moral entre los estudiantes”, dijo él. Y partiendo de la personalidad de Connie y sus aspiraciones, ofrecí una clase sobre albergues pequeños para la ciudad de Bozeman”.El resultado fue dos modelos, cada uno de sólo 14 metros cuadrados o un poquito más grande. Uno estaba diseñado para ser accesible a personas con discapacidades. Cada modelo incluía una cama personal, área de almacenaje, una ducha, un inodoro, un pequeño refrigerador, un horno microonda, un lavadero y espacio para una silla.Los residentes podrían recibir consejería, asistencia médica y ayuda para encontrar empleo hasta que puedan mudarse a viviendas permanentes. Foto de la Escuela de Arquitectura de la Universidad del Estado de Montana.Los estudiantes luego crearon  maquetas de cartón y las probaron, llegando a invitar a entrar en ellas a miembros de la comunidad de personas sin hogar. El semestre concluyó con un evento de puertas abiertas en diciembre. Más de 100 personas vinieron a ver las maqueta y a informarse sobre el proyecto, dijo Johnson.Seis estudiantes construirán las primeras casitas en un nuevo curso este semestre que también abordará algunos de los obstáculos regulatorios. El código de construcción de Bozeman, como los códigos de muchos ciudades a través del país, incluye restricciones sobre el uso de terrenos, el tamaño del espacio habitable y el trazado de la vivienda que no se ajustan fácilmente a las casitas, explicó Johnson. Sus estudiantes buscarán opciones que puedan presentarles a los funcionarios municipales.Y luego existe el reto de encontrar un sitio adecuado para lo que finalmente podrían ser las docenas de casitas y el centro comunitario de recursos. Savage no tiene ningún calendario definido para garantizar un sitio. Los factores a considerar incluyen costo, zonificación y proximidad a otras residencias.“De encontrarse disponible la parcela adecuada, podríamos avanzar más bien rápidamente”, dijo Savage. “Pero exigirá alguna alineación de los astros, como suele suceder con cualquier proyecto importante como éste”.En cuanto al costo de la construcción, los materiales necesarios para la construcción de cada casita se calculan en unos $10.000, o menos, si donan algunos de los materiales.La iglesia de Santiago Apóstol se ha comprometido con suficiente dinero para construir una de las casas, y una de las tareas de Pearson-Campbell es captar más iglesias y grupos comunitarios para que aporten dinero o incluso que ensamblen una de las casas mismas como un proyecto de servicio. Los estudiantes de Johnson esperan finalmente crear unas instrucciones de ensamblaje que resulte fácil para esos grupos construir las casas por sí mismos, semejante al montaje de los muebles de IKEA, contó Johnson.La ética moral que Johnson ve en muchos de sus alumnos con frecuencia se materializa en un deseo de construir edificios con ahorro de energía, dijo él, pero este proyecto se construye sobre un sentido de responsabilidad social.“Si esto puede darle a los que carecen de hogar una oportunidad de resolver los problemas que les colocan en una circunstancia de indigencia, debemos darles esa oportunidad”, afirmó.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él a [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

English church receives outpouring of support after arson attack forces…

first_img Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Anglican Communion News Service] A Church of England parish church in Hertfordshire was forced to cancel services Dec. 10 after arsonists caused significant damage to the building. Neighboring churches offered to assist – including the independent Trinity Life Church, which invited St. John’s congregation to use its Town Hall base as a venue for tea and coffee. Trinity Life also invited congregation members to join them for their 10:30 a.m. service, as did Melbourn Baptist Church. Neighboring Church of England parishes have also offered support. Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Anglican Communion An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET English church receives outpouring of support after arson attack forces cancelation of services In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Posted Dec 10, 2018 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more