Draymond Green Is Better Than Ever On Defense

2016-173.4%6.4% Draymond Green’s block rate usually increases during the playoffs 2013-143.04.5 2015-163.03.8 Blocked dunks are not only difficult to accumulate, players also run the risk of becoming a potential poster. “There’s definitely a sense of urgency, but it’s also [me] not caring if I get dunked on,” Green said when asked by FiveThirtyEight about his spike in blocked dunks. “Because every time you do it, you put yourself in that position. I like the reward we can reap from getting a block. That outweighs getting dunked on. The way I see it, it’s still just two points. I try to read what the offense is trying to do and be a step early, if I can.”Green, who’s averaging just under five blocks and steals a game combined this postseason, knows his aggressive approach is inevitably going to cause some embarrassment. And that was on display in Game 4 when Utah’s Derrick Favors got the best of him on one play.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/draymonddunkedon.mp400:0000:0000:10Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.But more important than a few blocked dunks, the Warriors rely heavily on Green’s instincts to read the opposing team’s offense. Many times, his ball denial or ability to close out on someone like Gordon Hayward forces the opponent to look elsewhere to get a shot; a huge accomplishment in the postseason, when teams learn which role players can handle the moment versus which ones can’t.Earlier in the series, acting Warriors coach Mike Brown was asked to compare or contrast Green’s defensive ability with that of Ben and Rasheed Wallace, from the mid-2000s Detroit Pistons teams. In his response, Brown praised Green, saying he was more versatile than those two while saying that Green took a similar leadership role in terms of how much he communicated with teammates on the court.“They anchored whatever defense they were a part of, and they did a lot of things that were kind of on the fly, that they felt,” Brown said. “That’s something Draymond does. I mean, he has carte blanche. Steve [Kerr] has empowered him since day one to quarterback the defense, and he does a heck of a job in that regard.”And as long as Green keeps improvising the way he has, it will be tough for anyone to challenge the Warriors.Check out our latest NBA predictions. Block percentage is a rate estimate of how many 2-point shots a player blocks while he’s on the court.Source: Basketball-Reference.com 2012-131.83.5 SEASONREG. SEASONPLAYOFFS Much like the regular season that preceded it, this NBA postseason has been marked by some eye-popping individual performances. As he tries to reach the NBA Finals for the seventh-straight year, LeBron James has been phenomenal, even by his own ridiculous standards. Meanwhile, point guards Isaiah Thomas and John Wall have been throwing haymakers at one another for the right to face James and the Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference Finals.But perhaps no star has raised the level of his game in the postseason as much as Golden State’s Draymond Green. Yes, he was great on offense in Game 4, recording a triple-double as his team finished a sweep of the Jazz1He averaged 16 points, nearly nine rebounds and seven assists for the series.. But it was his defense — both in this series and all postseason — that made his performance as special, if not more so, as Stephen Curry’s or Kevin Durant’s.Utah scored a meager 95 points per 100 plays with Green on the floor (down from 105 points per 100 with Green on the sidelines), connecting on just 52 percent of its shots inside of five feet with Green on the court (down from a respectable 61 percent with him on the bench), according to NBA.com. But Green’s raw defensive numbers in the series weren’t the real surprise — the Defensive Player of the Year frontrunner was statistically the best interior stopper in the NBA this season2Among players who played at least 50 games and defended three or more shots per game from close range — rather it was the emphatic way in which he repeatedly shut down the Jazz at the rim.On Monday night, Utah tried and failed to score on Green at the basket, shooting just 3 of 10 from close range with him nearby. You would have thought the Jazz had learned their lesson earlier in the series: In Game 2, they tried sneaking three alley-oops past Green, including two to Rudy Gobert, a skilled big and Defensive Player of the Year candidate in his own right. In all three instances, Green snuffed out the play.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/alleyoop1.mp400:0000:0000:07Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/draymondswat.mp400:0000:0000:08Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/greenswat2.mp400:0000:0000:06Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Those plays came on the heels of a series against Portland in which Green had a couple of similar rejections at the rim.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/greenrejection.mp400:0000:0000:10Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/greenrejection2.mp400:0000:0000:07Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.In all, he’s blocked four dunk attempts in 283 minutes this postseason, the most in the league. It’s important to remember here that blocking the dunks of 7-foot-1-inch NBA players is about as hard as it sounds. During the regular season, players were successful on better than 90 percent of their dunk attempts, according to Basketball-Reference.com. To give Green’s postseason performance even greater context, consider this: In his entire career — five seasons and 10,627 regular-season minutes — he had four such blocks, according to ESPN Stats & Information Group. 2014-152.92.5 read more

PSGs Collapse Completes A Week Of Champions League Mayhem

Check out our latest soccer predictions. We write to you with elbows tucked, stroopwafels out — and a new understanding of what’s possible in soccer. Just half of the second-leg games in the Champions League’s round of 16 are complete, and already two titans of the sport are gone thanks to a youthful rebellion and instant replay. The prediction models are as surprised as the rest of us.First, to Real Madrid’s dismantling Tuesday. Coming into the second leg of its tie against Ajax, Madrid led 2-1 and had a 75 percent chance of moving on in a tournament the club has won four of the past five years. Ajax was technically better than Madrid in the first leg, and our model gave the Dutch team some respect as a result. But it’s one thing to be Madrid’s equal and another to beat it 4-1 at the Bernabeu, exposing seemingly each of Los Blancos’ flaws since they lost Cristiano Ronaldo to Juventus at the end of last season. Led by homegrown phenoms Frenkie de Jong and Matthijs de Ligt, Ajax played the platonic ideal of free-flowing soccer, pirouetting through the midfield and capitalizing on Madrid’s missing captain, Sergio Ramos, who purposely got himself booked at the end of the first leg so he could be fresh (and cardless) for the quarterfinals. Instead of living to fight another day, Ramos serves as a cautionary tale.Ajax’s win was surprising; Manchester United’s was almost inconceivable. Heading into its second leg against Paris Saint-Germain, Man U had just a 3 percent chance of moving on — and its play on Wednesday showed why. United lost the possession game 72 percent to 28 percent and trailed substantially in shots. This did not appear to be a team that could overcome a 2-0 deficit from the first leg. Yet PSG gifted Man U two goals on defensive errors and could manage only one first-half goal of its own, putting United just one goal from winning on away goals. But Man U couldn’t gain much possession, let alone break through for a goal. But then the replay gods took pity. In the 90th minute, United’s Diogo Dalot fired the ball in the general direction of PSG’s goal, and PSG’s Presnel Kimpembe leapt to block it once it had crossed into the box. His elbow came with him, and as it separated from his chest, it knocked into the ball. The referees initially called a corner but then went to video review. The (controversial) judgment changed the call to a handball. A penalty shot was awarded, and Marcus Rashford converted it for a tie-breaking third road goal. The final whistle blew a few minutes later, and Manchester United had somehow pulled off a miracle.Two other games happened, we’ve been told. Porto had its own late drama Wednesday against Roma, including another penalty awarded on video review; the Portuguese squad wasn’t favored to move on heading into the match. And on Tuesday, Tottenham finished off Borussia Dortmund as calmly as Harry Kane finishes his penalty kicks.All of this leaves some havoc in our projections, and we still have four games to go in this round. Buckle up, and please keep your elbows inside the vehicle at all times. read more

Kickers Are Forever

In football, there are constant power struggles, both on and off the field: players battling players, offenses battling defenses, the passing game battling the running game, coaches battling coaches, and new ways of thinking battling old ways of thinking. And then there are kickers. Battling no one but themselves and the goalposts, they come on the field in moments most mundane and most decisive. They take all the blame when they fail, and little of the credit when they succeed. Year in and year out, just a little bit at a time, they get better. And better. And better. Until the game is completely different, and no one even noticed that kickers were one of the main reasons why.If you’ve been reading my NFL column Skeptical Football this season, you may have noticed that I write a lot about kickers. This interest has been building for a few years as I’ve watched field goals drained from long range at an ever-increasing rate, culminating in 2013, when NFL kickers made more than 67 percent of the kicks they took from 50-plus yards, giving them a record 96 such makes. There has been a lot of speculation about how kickers suddenly became so good at the long kick, ranging from performance-enhancing drugs (there have been a few possible cases) to the kickers’ special “k-balls” to more kick-friendly stadiums.So prior to the 2014 season, I set out to try to see how recently this improvement had taken place, whether it had been gradual or sudden, and whether it was specific to very long kicks or reflected improvement in kicking accuracy as a whole.What I found fundamentally changed my understanding of the game of football.1And possibly offered insight into how competitive sports can conceal remarkable changes in human capability.The complete(ish) history of NFL kickingPro Football Reference has kicking data broken down by categories (0-19 yards, 20-29, 30-39, 40-59 and 50+ yards) back to 1961. With this we can see how field goal percentage has changed through the years for each range of distances:It doesn’t matter the distance; kicking has been on a steady upward climb. If we look back even further, we can see indicators that kicking has been on a similar trajectory for the entire history of the league.The oldest data that Pro Football Reference has available is from 1932, when the eight teams in the NFL made just six field goals (it’s unknown how many they attempted). That year, kickers missed 37 of 113 extra-point attempts, for a conversion rate of 67.3 percent. The following year, the league moved the goal posts up to the front of the end zone — which led to a whopping 36 made field goals, and a skyrocketing extra-point conversion rate of 79.3 percent. With the uprights at the front of the end zone, kickers missed only 30 of 145 extra points.For comparison, those 30 missed extra-point attempts (all with the goalposts at the front of the end zone) are more than the league’s 28 missed extra-point attempts (all coming from 10 yards further out) from 2011 to 2014 — on 4,939 attempts.In 1938-39, the first year we know the number of regular field goals attempted, NFL kickers made 93 of 235 field-goal tries (39.6 percent) to go with 347 of 422 extra points (82.2 percent). In the ’40s, teams made 40.0 percent of their field goal tries (we don’t know what distances they attempted) and 91.3 percent of their XPs. In the ’50s, those numbers rose to 48.2 percent of all field goals and 94.8 percent of XPs. The ’60s must have seemed like a golden era: Kickers made 56 percent of all field goals (breaking the 50 percent barrier for the first time) and 96.8 percent of their extra points.For comparison, since 2010, NFL kickers have made 61.9 percent of their field goal attempts — from more than 50 yards.In the 1960s, we start to get data on field goal attempts broken down by distance, allowing for the more complete picture above. In 1972, the NFL narrowed the hash marks from 18.5 yards from 40, which improved field goal percentages overall by reducing the number of attempts taken from awkward angles. And then in 1974, the league moved the goal posts to the back of the end zone — but as kick distances are recorded relative to the posts, the main effect of this move was a small (and temporary) decline in the extra-point conversion rate (which you can see in the top line of the chart above). Then we have data on the kicks’ exact distance, plus field and stadium type, after 1993.2This info is likely out there for older kicks as well, but it wasn’t in my data.So let’s combine everything we know: Extra-point attempts and distances prior to 1961, kicks by category from 1961 to 1993, the kicks’ exact distance after 1993, and the changing placement of goal posts and hash marks. Using this data, we can model the likely success of any kick.With those factors held constant, here’s a look at how good NFL kickers have been relative to their set of kicks in any given year3This is done using a binomial probit regression with all the variables, using “year taken” as a categorical variable (meaning it’s not treated like a number, so 1961, 1962 and 1963 may as well be “Joe,” “Bob” and “Nancy”). This is similar to how SRS determines how strong each team is relative to its competition.:When I showed this chart to a friend of mine who’s a philosophy Ph.D.,4Hi, Nate! he said: “It’s like the Hacker Gods got lazy and just set a constant Kicker Improvement parameter throughout the universe.” The great thing about this is that since the improvement in kicking has been almost perfectly linear, we can treat “year” as just another continuous variable, allowing us to generalize the model to any kick in any situation at any point in NFL history.Applying this year-based model to our kicking distance data, we can see just how predictable the improvement in kicking has actually been:The model may give teams too much credit in the early ’60s — an era for which we have a lot less data — but over the course of NFL history it does extremely well (it also predicts back to 1932, not shown). What’s amazing is that, while the model incorporates things like hashmark location and (more recently) field type, virtually all the work is handled by distance and year alone. Ultimately, it’s an extremely (virtually impossibly) accurate model considering how few variables it relies on.5So how accurate is this thing? To be honest, in all my years of building models, I’ve never seen anything like it. The model misses a typical year/distance group prediction by an average of just 2.5 percent. Note that a majority of those predictions involve only a couple hundred observations — at most. For comparison, the standard deviation for 250 observations of a 75 percent event is 2.7 percent. In other words, the model pretty much couldn’t have done any better even if it knew the exact probability of each kick!While there is possibly a smidge of overfitting (there usually is), the risk here is lower than usual, since the vast majority of each prediction is driven solely by year and distance. Here’s the regression output:I wish I could take credit for this, but it really just fell into place. Nerds, perk up: The z-value on “season” is 46.2! If every predictive relationship I looked for were that easy to find, life would be sweet.This isn’t just trivia, it has real-world implications, from tactical (how should you manage the clock knowing your opponent needs only moderate yardage to get into field goal range?) to organizational (maybe a good kicker is worth more than league minimum). And then there’s the big one.Fourth downIf you’re reading this site, there’s a good chance you scream at your television a lot when coaches sheepishly kick or punt instead of going for it on fourth down. This is particularly true in the “dead zone” between roughly the 25- and 40-yard lines, where punts accomplish little and field goals are supposedly too long to be good gambles.I’ve been a card-carrying member of Team Go-For-It since the ’90s. And we were right, back then. With ’90s-quality kickers, settling for field goals in the dead zone was practically criminal. As of 10 years ago — around when these should-we-go-for-it models rose to prominence — we were still right. But a lot has changed in 10 years. Field-goal kicking is now good enough that many previous calculations are outdated. Here’s a comparison between a field-goal kicking curve from 2004 vs. 2014:There’s no one universally agreed-upon system for when you should go for it on fourth down. But a very popular one is The New York Times’ 4th Down Bot, which is powered by models built by Brian Burke — founder of Advanced Football Analytics and a pioneer in the quantitative analysis of football. It calculates the expected value (either in points or win percentages) for every fourth-down play in the NFL, and tweets live results during games. Its 19,000-plus followers are treated to the bot’s particular emphasis on the many, many times coaches fail to go for it on fourth down when they should.A very helpful feature of the 4th Down Bot is that its game logs break down each fourth-down decision into its component parts. This means that we can see exactly what assumptions the bot is making about the success rate of each kick. Comparing those to my model, it looks to me like the bot’s kickers are approximately 2004-quality. (I asked Burke about this, and he agrees that the bot is probably at least a few years behind,6I don’t blame Burke or others for not updating their models based on the last few years. It’s good to be prudent and not assume that temporary shifts one way or the other will hold. Normally it is better to go with the weight of history rather than with recent trends. But in this case, the recent trends are backed by the weight of history. and says that its kicking assumptions are based on a fitted model of the most recent eight years of kicking data.7Here’s his full statement: “The bot is about 3-4 years behind the trends in FG accuracy, which have been improving at longer distances. It uses a kicking model fitted to the average of the recent 8-year period of data. AFA’s more advanced model for team clients is on the current ‘frontier’ of kick probabilities, and can be tuned for specific variables like kicker range, conditions, etc. Please keep in mind the bot is intended to be a good first-cut on the analysis and a demonstration of what is possible with real-time analytics. It’s not intended as the final analysis.”)But more importantly, these breakdowns allow us to essentially recalculate the bot’s recommendations given a different set of assumptions. And the improvement in kicking dramatically changes the calculus of whether to go for it on fourth down in the dead zone. The following table compares “Go or No” charts from the 4th Down Bot as it stands right now, versus how it would look with projected 2015 kickers8The exact values in the chart may differ slightly from the reports on the Times’ website because I had to reverse-engineer the bot’s decision-making process. But basically I’m assuming the model gets everything exactly right as far as expected value from various field locations, chances of converting a fourth-down attempt, etc., then recalculating the final expected value comparison using 2015 kickers.:Having better kickers makes a big difference, as you can see from the blue sea on the left versus the red sea on the right. (The 4th Down Bot’s complete “Go or No” table is on the Times’ website.)Getting these fourth-down calls wrong is potentially a big problem for the model. As a test case, I tried applying the 4th Down Bot’s model to a selection of the most relevant kicks from between 25 and 55 yards in 2013, then looked at what coaches actually did in those scenarios. I graded both against my kicking-adjusted results for 2013. While the updated version still concluded that coaches were too conservative (particularly on fourth-and-short), it found that coaches were (very slightly) making more correct decisions than the 4th Down Bot.The differences were small (coaches beat the bot by only a few points over the entire season), but even being just as successful as the bot would be a drastic result considering how absolutely terrible coaches’ go-for-it strategy has been for decades. In other words, maybe it’s not that NFL coaches were wrong, they were just ahead of their time!Time-traveling kickersHaving such an accurate model also allows us to see the overall impact kicking improvement has had on football. For example, we can calculate how kickers from different eras would have performed on a common set of attempts. In the following chart, we can see how many more or fewer points per game the typical team would have scored if kickers from a different era had taken its kicks (the red line is the actual points per game from field goals that year):The last time kickers were as big a part of the game as they are today, the league had to move the posts back! Since the rule change, the amount of scoring from field goals has increased by more than 2 points per game. A small part of the overall increase (the overall movement of the red line) is a result of taking more field goals, but most of it comes from the improvement in accuracy alone (the width of the “ribbon”).How does this compare to broader scoring trends? As a baseline for comparison, I’ve taken the average points scored in every NFL game since 1961, and then seen how much league scoring deviated from that at any given point in time (the “scoring anomaly”). Then I looked at how much of that anomaly was a result of kicking accuracy.9The scoring deviation on this chart is calculated relative to the average game over the period. The kicking accuracy is relative to the median kicker of the period.:Amid wild fluctuations in scoring, kicking has remained a steady, driving force.For all the talk of West Coast offenses, the invention of the pro formation, the wildcat, 5-wide sets, the rise of the pass-catching tight-end, Bill Walsh, the Greatest Show On Turf, and the general recognition that passing, passing and more passing is the best way to score in football, half the improvement in scoring in the past 50-plus years of NFL history has come solely from field-goal kickers kicking more accurately.10Side note, I’ve also looked at whether kicking improvement has been a result of kickers who are new to the league being better than older kickers, or of older kickers getting better themselves. The answer is both.The past half-century has seen an era of defensive innovation — running roughly from the mid-’60s to the mid-’70s — a chaotic scoring epoch with wild swings until the early ’90s, and then an era of offensive improvement. But the era of kickers is forever.Reuben Fischer-Baum contributed graphics.CORRECTION (Jan. 28, 2:22 p.m.): An earlier version of this article incorrectly gave the distances from which extra-point kicks were taken in 1933 and in recent years. Actual extra-point distances aren’t recorded. read more

Sorry Mike Trout The AL West Belongs To The Astros

5Oakland Athletics7679797577.1 EXPECTED NUMBER OF WINS RANKTEAMPECOTAFANGRAPHSDAVENPORTWESTGATEAVERAGE How forecasters view the AL West 4Los Angeles Angels7883818180.6 3Texas Rangers8483818583.1 2Seattle Mariners8583888685.4 neil (Neil Paine, FiveThirtyEight senior sportswriter): I think the AL West is a really fascinating division because the team that is probably the best in it right now (Houston) finished third last year, the third-best team (Texas) finished first, and those two teams are sandwiched around one (Seattle) that has had the hardest playoff luck possible in recent years. And we haven’t even mentioned a team (the Los Angeles Angels) that contains the potential G.O.A.T.Anyway, the projections say the Astros should be the favorites, so let’s start with them. In a weird way, was 2016 an example of the Plexiglas Principle for them? Their actual record only dropped by 2 wins from 2015, but they were down 10 Pythagorean wins in 2016 after a 22-win Pythagorean improvement the year before. Does that portend an improvement this year?ckahrl: Sadly, you don’t get to carry over any accrued, unmet expectations for wins. Hence the wisdom of shaking up that lineup as much as they did by adding Carlos Beltran, Josh Reddick and Brian McCann.rob: It was less the Plexiglas Principle — which is really just regression to the mean — and more the case of a legitimately good team snakebit by poor sequencing and Pythagorean luck.That poor luck does not in and of itself guarantee an improvement, but the talent on the team does. Most of the best players from last year are back, and they made a few additions, which together makes them, on paper, the best team in the division.ckahrl: That said, I still have questions about them …I’m reminded of an old saying that I think belongs to Bill James, that a team with five viable first-base options may not have a first baseman. Plus, can George Springer play a whole lot of center field over a full season? And as interesting as pitcher Lance McCullers should be, and as much as I like what they’re doing with pitcher Chris Devenski, is that a staff we should be entirely sold on? I see how the pieces work individually; I wonder about the aggregate.neil: Yeah, the biggest thing for them might be whether a rotation that was way down from its 2015 form — most notably Dallas Keuchel, but also Collin McHugh and Mike Fiers — can reclaim what went right two years ago.ckahrl: A lot of analysts are banking that Keuchel comes back a good ways, but I also accept the suggestion that this team needed to add a better starter than, say, Charlie Morton. But I guess that’s what the trade deadline will be for.neil: In that department, it also helps that they have the third-best farm system in the game. So they have the assets to conceivably go out and make something happen on the trade market if need be.rob: I’m a believer in the Astros’ rotation. I think last year was a bit of an aberration. FIP (fielding independent pitching) has its problems in terms of describing their performance, but it still has validity as a predictive metric. And from that standpoint, we should expect some bounce-backs from Keuchel and McHugh, at least. The 16.4 percent home runs-per-flyball rate that Keuchel managed last year wasn’t entirely his fault, even if he allowed some hard contact.ckahrl: That hard contact seems like a consistent concern, though, no? That isn’t stuff you can fix with defense.rob: That’s true, but contact management is a skill that fluctuates a lot. That goes as much for Good Keuchel — the one who allowed maybe the softest contact in the league in 2015 — as it does for Bad Keuchel. He may end up as a mediocre contact-manager, but that would still be a decided improvement.neil: It also bears mentioning that on the offensive side, Houston had the youngest lineup in baseball in 2016 — though they gave some of that up when they revamped things, like Christina mentioned. But this does seem like a very balanced, complete team now, assuming that the pitchers rebound.Bottom line — is it crazy to think the Astros are on the verge of a great season?rob: No. But I think the more likely outcome is a good season.ckahrl: If Keuchel and McHugh come back as far as they might, if the bullpen gels, if Springer is fully healthy for a season and can handle center, if Yuli Gurriel pans out in the most exciting ways, sure, they could live up to the mid-’90s win total that some of the projectors have them down for.So it isn’t exactly magical thinking. But how many teams get everything they want and hope for?rob: The 2016 Cubs say hi. ;)ckahrl: Hah, yes.neil: OK, so if you’re both a little more bearish on the ’Stros than the projections above, are you bullish on the Mariners or — gasp — the Rangers?ckahrl: Speaking of the Plexiglas Principle, it is certainly fashionable to bash the Rangers.rob: I’m the Designated Rangers Basher around here, so I have to say that they seem like an OK team. But they aren’t as good as their record from last year, and they didn’t make massive improvements. In contrast, the Mariners were good last year and ended up being crushed under the wheels of the Rangers One-Run Magic Machine.Of course, as Christina can tell you, I was wrong about the Rangers last year, while she somehow saw their impressive season coming. So you should probably listen to her.ckahrl: And sure enough, I’m not that down on them. A full year of catcher Jonathan Lucroy and starter Yu Darvish? Those are good things. It’s easy to knock Mike Napoli, but will he be worse than the .699 OPS (on-base plus slugging) the Rangers got from their first basemen last year? (No.) And don’t we expect growth from Nomar Mazara? (We should.)It’s when you get into that rotation’s depth — or the complete lack of any — that things get scary.neil: Yep, when Dillon Gee is the back-of-the-rotation reinforcement …rob: Agreed about the lack of depth, especially in view of the Rangers’ consistent injury problems. Last year, I remember a lot of people saying that they couldn’t repeat their injury woes from the year(s) before. But they ended up with the fourth-most DL days in 2016, according to Jeff Zimmerman’s DL database. The strongest predictor of future injuries is past injuries, and I expect that their depth will be tested once again.neil: And all of this compounds on itself if their true talent was closer to that 82-win Pythagorean team last year than the 95 wins they had in the standings. Your margin for error on injuries and offseason pickups goes down to nothing really quickly.ckahrl: Agreed. To give them their due, though, manager Jeff Banister handles his bullpens well, which helps milk the margins. But even so, the Rangers need to throw good money after bad — and maybe a prospect or two — to add a starting pitcher and take themselves seriously this season.neil: Meanwhile — and you touched on this Rob (plus wrote about it last year) — the Mariners can’t catch a break, it seems. Do they break that trend this season?rob: The Mariners are still squarely in that terrible zone of playoff probabilities that has so haunted them for the past 20 years. If the projections hold true, they’ll be right around 50 percent to make the playoffs, with their success contingent on things like how other teams perform and the vagaries of Pythagorean records. I’d like to say, “Yes, this is their year,” but I’ve seen enough Mariners bad luck to hedge a bit.ckahrl: Talk about a fun team taking some fun risks, though. I like the depth in the rotation and in their outfield. I like a team willing to take a chance on first baseman Dan Vogelbach. I like seeing a team valuing strong complementary pieces, like utilityman Danny Valencia.neil: And starting pitcher James Paxton is the real deal. He led all qualified AL pitchers in FIP last year.They were, though, the second-oldest team in MLB last year. Also, I wonder if Felix Hernandez is running out of steam just as the rest of the roster is finally gaining it.ckahrl: Yes, and they didn’t get a lot younger by adding thirtysomethings like Jarrod Dyson, Valencia and Carlos Ruiz. There aren’t a lot of tomorrows in their mix. And the bullpen is … well, it’s going to be interesting if the organization doesn’t have another call-up like Edwin Diaz to help contribute.rob: To make matters worse, Hisashi Iwakuma has looked cooked in spring training this year, not that such performances count for much.ckahrl: What if Yovani Gallardo is also ready to be beaten like a drum and King Felix is done? Things get ugly early. At which point, GM Jerry Dipoto can break the team up for parts with his usual manic energy.neil: I guess Mariners fans have stuck with them through the playoff drought this long — what’s another rebuilding cycle? But that’s probably overly pessimistic. There’s a universe where they win this division, or at least a wild card.rob: The wild card seems like slim consolation, given the length of their playoff drought.ckahrl: As an A’s fan, I can agree that the wild card is not much to get excited about.neil: We’ll get to the A’s really soon! But first we should talk the Angels.ckahrl: Leave the fork, we can stick it in the A’s later.neil: So … the Angels are just going to keep on wasting Mike Trout’s talent forever, aren’t they?rob: Yep. The gap in projected wins above replacement between Trout and the next best player on the team is about 5 wins. And Trout has consistently overperformed all predictions, so it may end up closer to 7. He’s ridiculous, the rest of the team is terrible, and personally I see them as closer to PECOTA’s 78-win projection than a .500 outfit.ckahrl: They’re an interesting team because they did a nice job filling huge holes by getting Danny Espinosa and Cameron Maybin for very little. Even if Garrett Richards is all the way back, I just don’t see how that staff keeps them in enough games to get them much further than .500. But at least there are potential slugfests to enjoy now.rob: I struggle to get excited about Espinosa or Maybin. I know they’ve both had good performances at times, but Steamer puts them down as below-average players this year. Or exactly the type of player who ends up playing alongside Mike Trout in a disappointing campaign.ckahrl: Improvement is relative. The kitchen linoleum might be the ceiling for those two, but it’s better than what the Angels have gotten from those lineup slots.neil: Still, it does seem like shuffling deck chairs around on the Titanic. (Ben Revere? Really?) They also have the second-worst farm system in the majors, so help is not on the way.ckahrl: The thing about Trout is … he’s still only 25 years old and signed through 2020. Is it a wasted year? Probably, even if they eke out a whopping 80 or 82 wins. Is that enough of a moral victory to help them with their payroll hangover from the Pujols/Hamilton/Wilson splurge that worked out less than well? Maybe, because I wonder if the Angels aren’t positioning themselves to be players in the stronger free-agent markets of the next couple winters.neil: Amazingly, Pujols’ contract ends after Trout’s does!rob: I do think there is reason to get excited about the long-term future of the Angels. They’ve developed their analytics department in a smart way and made some good hires. Simply hiring people isn’t enough, of course, but in a few years, I can see that paying dividends. Of course, they’ve got the Mike Scioscia problem — his inability to take direction from a GM ended the tenure of the last smart one they had.ckahrl: Well, I wouldn’t sell Angels GM Billy Eppler short. Help isn’t coming soon, but having Trout helps mask what might effectively be a necessary bottom-up rebuild for the organization in the meantime.neil: In the short term, it’s difficult to envision the Angels escaping that 80-ish win purgatory they’ve been trapped in for most of the Trout Era.ckahrl: Have to agree that’s the Angels’ lot, although I’m intrigued by what will happen when Eppler has a shot at spending some money. But with more than $70 million committed per year to Trout, Pujols and Andrelton Simmons in 2018 and beyond, he won’t have as much to spend as he’d like.neil: Finally, we’ve got Christina’s A’s bringing up the rear of the projections — with an OK win total (by their standards)? They made some additions over the offseason that might bring them toward respectability, but are they moving out of a rebuild? What are they doing exactly?ckahrl: Speaking of shuffling deck chairs …It’s brutal, simply brutal, but it’s also a return to the low-stakes, low-upsides bets like when they were going after David DeJesus.rob: I’m really not clear about Oakland’s long-term plan. I feel like the A’s have gone from Moneyball-era prophets of the analytics era to an erratic front office pursuing a series of disconnected moves without an obvious scheme for the next three to five years.ckahrl: The farm system has a few interesting position players, and starter Sean Manaea is going to be fun to watch, but it’s rough sledding in the meantime. Rajai Davis as a 36-year-old everyday center fielder will be a catastrophe for these young pitchers.neil: Just the thing for jump-starting that Sonny Gray renaissance! (If he ever can stay healthy enough to pitch.)rob: Or pitch effectively — he struggled last year in part because of some injuries.neil: Crazy how quickly he went from being one of their lone bright spots to being a non-factor.rob: On that point, the Athletics had the second-most DL days last year, behind only the Dodgers (who seemed to have purposefully built their rotation out of glass). They are likely to have problems again this year, so if their projection is off, I expect it to be overly optimistic.neil: Does Billy Beane get any residual benefit of the doubt at this point? Any hope for the next few seasons? Or is it just a matter of ownership and biding time for a new park?ckahrl: At this point, you can’t give them any residual benefit of the doubt. Results do matter, and with the coming sunset of their revenue sharing, they aren’t going to be anyone else’s charity case. I like Marcus Semien and Khris Davis, and I’d like to pretend I have faith Yonder Alonso’s nice spring means something. But I think 100 losses is way more likely than 78 wins.rob: Beane was brilliant for a long time (see Benjamin Morris’s article), but there’s a strong Red Queen dynamic in baseball analytics these days: You have to run as fast as you can just to stay in the same place. Although the A’s had a strong analytics advantage early on, they haven’t kept up with the pace of growth of analytics in the league. I don’t think they are terribly behind the state of the art in baseball now, but they are falling further and further toward the back of the pack.So I’m inclined not to give him any benefit of the doubt. Staffing is an incomplete proxy for analytics expertise, so maybe he has — or will generate — other advantages to make up for the small front office. But as Christina said, at the end of the day, it’s all about results, and they’ve had some pretty poor results recently. 1Houston Astros9391949292.4 Based on projected wins or over/under win totals. Data gathered on March 21, 2017.Sources: Baseball Prospectus, Fangraphs, Clay Davenport, Las Vegas Review-Journal In honor of the 2017 Major League Baseball season, which starts April 2, FiveThirtyEight is assembling some of our favorite baseball writers to chat about what’s ahead. Today, we focus on the American League West with ESPN.com MLB editor Christina Kahrl and FiveThirtyEight baseball columnist Rob Arthur. The transcript below has been edited. read more

Ohio State womens soccer uses late goal to top Purdue 32

The OSU women’s soccer team participates in ‘Carmen Ohio’ following a 3-2 win over Purdue on Oct. 8 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.Credit: Anbo Yao / Lantern photographerThe Ohio State women’s soccer team (7-3-3, 2-2-2) tallied its first victory since Sept. 25 on Thursday evening after the Buckeyes topped the Purdue Boilermakers 3-2. The Buckeyes were first to score when sophomore forward Sammy Edwards finished from 10 yards in the center of the box off an assist from junior forward Lindsay Agnew in just the third minute of play. OSU came out of the gates with a lot of energy, evident by the quick score. “I think we know we are in a tough spot in the standings right now, so we needed to come out this weekend and get two wins,” junior forward Nichelle Prince said. “So today was the first day of that and we just really bought it and everyone was on their game today.”OSU maintained its lead for the next 10 minutes before the Boilermakers leveled the match on sophomore midfielder/forward Erika Arkans’ shot from 10 yards out. The half continued with back and forth play with multiple opportunities for both teams to score. OSU coach Lori Walker said she was pleased with the improvements her team made to find success in Thursday’s matchup. “I’m really proud of the effort that they put in tonight, and it’s something that we’ve really been asking them to raise every single game, every day,” Walker said. “We’ve tried to make practices as enjoyable as possible the last week and a half, and I really think that it really started to show today.”Senior captain midfielder Michela Paradiso scored the Buckeyes’ next goal in the 34th minute, her second goal of the season.The Scarlet and Gray headed into halftime leading the Boilermakers 2-1, while also holding an 8-5 advantage in shots, including 5-1 on goal. While holding the edge, the Buckeyes knew at halftime that the game was far from over. “It’s a 90-minute game. Forty-five minutes we have given our heart and our soul, but we’ve got to come out and do that again,” Walker said. “We haven’t really done that; this is one of the first games I feel like we’ve put all the pieces together over the 90 minutes.”Prince played an aggressive and dominant game, which earned her effusive praise from Walker.  “She has so many just special, God-given talents, and what we really try to do is encourage her to utilize them,” Walker said. “Just seeing her with a smile on her face because she’s back at her full pace, if you will, I was just really pleased with what she has been giving our team.” The Boilermakers tied the game in the 61st minute when junior forward Maddy Williams shot from 20 yards out, deflecting off the hand of OSU freshman goalkeeper Devon Kerr and into the back of the net. Prince said this was the Buckeyes’ time to show what they’re made of. “It’s hard when you’re under pressure. You can either crack or step up to the plate, and I think that’s what we did,” Prince said. “We came to play today and we weren’t afraid. We just played our game and came out really hard.”Despite giving up the tying goal, OSU did not back down. In the 67th minute, sophomore midfielder Nikki Walts netted her fourth goal of the season after she curled a shot from 25 yards inside the right post to give the Buckeyes the lead.With the lead in hand, OSU continued to bring pressure and intensity until the very end. “We challenged them and basically tried to treat this like a championship game,” Walker said. “This game really matters, not that any other game doesn’t matter, but this one was a critical one.”The Buckeyes will look to continue their winning ways on Sunday, as they are set to play host to the Maryland Terrapins at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Kickoff is scheduled for 1 p.m. read more

The Big Ten bubble watch

With the regular season winding down, let’s take a look at how each Big Ten team stacks up in the battle for NCAA Tournament entry:Ohio State (23-7, 13-4)The injury to Purdue forward Robbie Hummel completely shifted the Big Ten landscape. It devastates the Boilermakers and gives an opportunity to both Ohio State and Michigan State to enhance their resumes over the next two weeks. In the event that OSU, MSU and Purdue all finish tied for first in the conference (a very realistic scenario), the Buckeyes would earn the top seed in the conference tournament based on tiebreakers. A win tonight against Illinois would clinch OSU a share of the Big Ten title. Thad Matta’s crew has won nine of its last 10 games and could be looking at a No. 2 seed for the NCAA Tournament if it wins the Big Ten Tournament. Otherwise, OSU will likely fit the bill for a No. 3 seed.Purdue (24-4, 12-4)The loss of Hummel to a torn ACL last week sucked the life out of West Lafayette after plenty of buzz about the Boilermakers’ realistic Final Four aspirations. Now, with perhaps their most valuable player sidelined for the rest of the year, Purdue will be saying, “What could have been.” The Boilermakers nearly blew a sizeable lead against Minnesota when Hummel went down. Unless they somehow capture the Big Ten Tournament title, his injury probably cost the team a No. 1 seed. Still, a No. 2 or No. 3 seed seems likely as long as Purdue doesn’t bow out too early in the conference tournament. Purdue can still win the regular season title if Ohio State falters against Illinois and the Boilermakers win their remaining two games.Michigan State (22-7, 12-4)The Spartans took advantage of Hummel’s absence in Sunday’s victory at Purdue. The NCAA Tournament Committee takes into account recent play and that victory certainly helps Tom Izzo’s squad, which had lost four of its last six games entering the matchup with the Boilermakers. Michigan State reached the National Championship Game a year ago as a No. 2 seed. A conquest through the Big Ten Tournament could result in another deuce for Sparty. Otherwise, a No. 3 seed appears probable.Wisconsin (21-7, 11-5)The quiet team that nobody talks about, Wisconsin has the same number of losses as both Ohio State and Michigan State. Just like those teams, the Badgers were forced to play a stretch of their schedule without a crucial player, forward Jon Leuer. The Badgers split their two meetings with all three Big Ten teams ranked ahead of them, making Wisconsin a dangerous sleeper in the conference tournament. A series of victories in Indianapolis could vault the Badgers from a likely No. 5 seed to a No. 3 slot.Illinois (18-11, 10-6)Illinois missed a critical opportunity to move a step closer to locking up an NCAA Tournament bid with a 62-60 loss to Minnesota on Saturday. Bruce Weber’s crew probably needs two more victories, whether they come against OSU or Wisconsin or in the Big Ten tournament.Minnesota (17-11, 8-8)The Gophers really needed to pull out last Wednesday’s game against Purdue, but even without Hummel’s services, the Boilermakers eked out a victory, delivering a crushing blow to Minnesota’s postseason hopes. Sunday’s victory at Illinois certainly helped Minnesota’s case and wins at Michigan and against Iowa this week would give the Gophers a more realistic shot at an at-large bid. A win or two in the Big Ten Tournament wouldn’t hurt either. read more

Commentary Buzz about Ohio State basketball not the same

The Ohio State men’s basketball team is coming off arguably its biggest win of the season, taking down archrival Michigan, 56-53, but I still don’t care. OK, it’s not that I don’t care, but I just am not nearly as interested as I have been in previous years. Teams led by Jared Sullinger, Evan Turner and Greg Oden were the things my life revolved around. School, work, even relationships took a back seat to watching these teams play. Whatever the record, although they were typically fantastic, I would find the Buckeyes on television and shut out all else. But this season I have found it harder and harder to get really into OSU basketball games. Although the turnout at Woody’s for those students who couldn’t attend the Michigan game might tell you otherwise, there are many students who are dealing with the same indifference. The passion and pure unadulterated joy that came to campus last year after home victories against Duke and Indiana just has not been matched this season. But what is it that is keeping this talented team from garnering the following that previous Thad Matta-led squads have had? It is hard to pinpoint an exact reason as to what has changed from such a short time ago since there are so many factors contributing to the decline in interest. Potentially most clear of all is the inflated expectations this team has suffered from. Ranked No. 4 overall in the preseason AP poll, OSU hasn’t quite lived up to these lofty beginnings, dropping three games to some very talented teams in Duke and Illinois and at home against Kansas. But the drop-off from where they began to where they are now has been a rude awakening for fans who have become accustomed to a consistent top-10 team. Add the lack of new recruits this year, a perfect football season stealing the spotlight from basketball and what I am terming as the Jared Sullinger hangover, it is no wonder fans are showing a lack of enthusiasm this year. With the depth of the conference this year, every game is going to matter and home-court advantage will play into the Buckeyes’ chances at competing for the Big Ten Championship. The fans could by key down the stretch for OSU. Looking ahead, the Buckeyes will travel to Michigan State for another tough test against the Spartans Saturday at 6 p.m. before returning to Columbus to take on the Iowa Hawkeyes. read more

Ohio State wrestlers Logan Steiber Nick Heflin Big Ten champions

Ohio State redshirt-junior Logan Stieber takes down Notre Dame College sophomore Maurice Miller in the 141-pound match Nov. 15 at St. John Arena. OSU won, 29-11.Credit: Ethan Day / Lantern photographerA pair of Ohio State wrestlers are the Big Ten’s best in their respective weight classes.Senior Nick Heflin and redshirt-junior Logan Stieber joined exclusive company Sunday, taking home the Big Ten Championship in the 197-pound and 141-pound weight classes at the Kohl Center in Madison, Wis., according to an OSU press release.Steiber defeated Penn State freshman Zain Retherford, 7-3, in the 141-pound championship match to capture his third-straight conference crown. He became just the second OSU wrestler in program history to do so, joining Kevin Randleman, who wrestled for the Buckeyes from 1991-93.Steiber’s victory against Retherford comes as a bit of payback, as Retherford defeated the three-time conference champion in Dec. 15 in what was his first loss in just more than a year.Steiber is now 25-1 on the season, having won 16 consecutive matches since falling to Zetherford in December.Heflin was the conference runner up at 174 pounds in 2011, but took down Penn State sophomore Morgan McIntosh, 5-3, to capture the title Sunday.The senior has now won 14 straight matches, and the victory against McIntosh was the 95th of his career.With their victories, Steiber and Heflin automatically qualify for the 2014 NCAA Championships, set to take place March 20-22 in Oklahoma City.A total of five other Buckeyes also qualified for the NCAAs with their respective performances Sunday — 184-pound redshirt-sophomore Kenny Courts, 125-pound redshirt-freshman Nick Roberts, 133-pound Johnni DiJulius, 174-pound sophomore Mark Martin and heavyweight redshirt-freshman Nick Tavanello. Redshirt-senior Ian Paddock is set to wrestle in the 149-pound weight class as well after earning an at-large bid Wednesday.The Buckeyes finished fourth as a team with 86.5 points. Penn State took home the team championship with 140.5 points. read more

Couple sacked housekeeper who let boyfriend stay at £10m mansion and drove

first_imgHowever Mr Pyke said: “I’m not contracted to work weekends and I had been told I wouldn’t be needed until the following Monday.”Mrs Gottschalk later sent him a text saying: “F— off and get out my house.” At the tribunal, she said: “I’m not proud of it.” Mr Pyke said he was shocked as he thought the issue was “sorted”.He said: “I said in the text message ‘I’ve left you a voicemail’. I have great respect for her and there’s no reason I would speak to her in the manner that’s being portrayed.”I would have been as helpful as possible. I heard nothing for three hours so thought that was job done and dusted. The next I heard was from the PA asking if I’d seen the email.”I wasn’t expecting my job to be on the line and to be suddenly homeless and have to leave the property. To suddenly receive this message, I had no idea what was going on.”He told the tribunal that since he was sacked he had looked for more work and had received offers, almost appearing on a television show with Bear Grylls as a possible employment opportunity. He is now starting work as a gardener three to four days a week.Mrs Gottschalk said: “It was very clear your job was at risk. You had abused your situation as house manager. You had used vehicles, you let people onto the property without our knowledge, you made money off us on our property.”The tribunal was adjourned for a reserved judgement. I wasn’t expecting my job to be on the line and to be suddenly homeless and have to leave the propertyRobin Pyke Millionaire banker Maximilian Gottschalk and his company director wife Jane outside the tribunalCredit:Vagner Vidal/INS Robin Pyke When the couple came to spend Christmas in Henley in 2015 they said “they started to see the cracks.”They were unhappy Mr Pyke kept a dog, owned by tenants who had stayed at the mansion while the family were in the UK, on the property. He had charged the former tenants £500 per week to care for the animal.Mrs Gottschalk said Mr Pyke had made out the dog had just been left at the property by the tenants.”I work with Animals Asia and I get very upset about these things,” she told the tribunal.”I accused the owner of abandoning her dog on our property, but I was shocked to find out he was being paid £500 a week for this, which was a huge amount.”Mr Pyke responded: “I had cleared that I would look after the dog with the Gottschalks, I just hadn’t told them about the money.”I felt it was a personal agreement, I didn’t feel it was their need to know. Other staff on site earn money they don’t disclose. It was just an extra income to me.”The Gottschalks also disliked Mr Pyke’s boyfriend staying at the property without their knowledge or consent, the panel heard.Mrs Gottschalk described one morning when she was staying at the property and said that she awoke at 6.30am to see a man on the property she did not know. “It would be nice to know who’s on the property when we’re there with the children, it’s just a courteous thing,” she said.Addressing Mr Pyke at the tribunal, she said: “I had asked you to introduce him to me because I was uncomfortable with the situation.”The judge also heard the couple were unhappy that Mr Pyke had used their cars, including a Porsche, while they were away – although he claimed he had an arrangement with them.An email sent by Mr Gottschalk in January 2016 said he was “surprised” the cars were taken out for personal use.Mr Pyke said: “I never used their cars for personal use. I agreed with them I would use the cars to get them running.”There was an agreement to use them to get them running but other than that I would cycle everywhere,” he told the tribunal. I did use the truck for personal use for a long time because I had problems with my car.”The Gottschalks told the tribunal they had given Mr Pyke a “final warning” in March this year after a formal meeting following Mrs Gottschalk finding out about his financial arrangement to keep the dog.However, Mr Pyke denied it was a formal disciplinary meeting and described it as just a “chat in the kitchen”.”The meeting was that casual that Jane didn’t even need to be there for the first part of it. It couldn’t have been that serious an issue that she didn’t need to be there because she fancied a bath first,” he said.However Mrs Gottschalk said it was “formal in a domestic setting” and added Mr Pyke got emotional and even offered to move out that evening.The couple said they and Mr Pyke met again two days later and offered him another chance.However, in June 2016 the issues came to a head again after Mr Pyke was asked to take Mrs Gottschalk’s mother to the airport.Mr Pyke said he had plans for a Father’s Day lunch so could not do the airport trip.Mrs Gottschalk said: “She’s quite independent my mum, she lives three minutes away. I had said ‘if there’s anything she needs please go and help her out’.”She had never asked for anything. But on this occasion her friend who usually helped her, couldn’t. She said she found Mr Pyke’s refusal very curt adding: “I found it very rude and was embarrassed by it.” Robin Pyke outside the tribunal hearingCredit:Vagner Vidal/INS Millionaire banker Maximilian Gottschalk and his company director wife Jane outside the tribunal The couple travel between London, where they bought a home from singer Robbie Williams, and other homes in Hong Kong, Ibiza, Switzerland and Henley.They flew back to the UK for the tribunal hearing in Reading, Berkshire, where they and Mr Pyke gave evidence about life at the property in Henley-on-Thames, where Mr Pyke had worked for 13 years with other staff.The judge heard that Gottschalks assumed the couple’s staff “don’t count the hours” and expect them to “go the extra mile” when working for them at the Georgian mansion, which they use as their main UK residence.However, their former house manager claimed he was unfairly dismissed by the family after they placed him under so much stress that he was forced to seek professional help before he eventually received a text stating “f— off and leave my house”.Mr Pyke was tasked with looking after the Gottschalks’ mansion, which sits at the end of a long driveway with its own fountain and tennis courts.Mr Gottschalk is a high-powered German-Swiss banker and is the only son of Joachim Gottschalk, who floated family firm Gottex for $1.9 billion in 2007.Mrs Gottschalk founded Jax, which sells coconut products around the world and has also worked as a creative director for ski and surf wear company Perfect Moment.The couple spend most of their time in Hong Kong, where their five children attend a Chinese-speaking school, but spend Christmas and the summer holiday in Henley. The family split the rest of their time between London, Ibiza and Switzerland.The tribunal was told that Mr Pyke had worked at the mansion for 13 years, first as a gardener but became house manager for the couple in September 2014.He told the panel that towards the end of his employment he could not keep up with the work demanded by the millionaire couple. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Stella McCartney (left) and Jane Gottschalk at the launch of Jax Coco coconut water in 2012Credit:Nick Harvey/WireImage Stella McCartney (left) and Jane Gottschalk at the launch of Jax Coco coconut water in 2012 He told employment judge Andrew Gumbiti-Zimuto he had expected to stay working at the home for a long time, but was unexpectedly and abruptly dismissed.He lived at the property and told the tribunal the dismissal made him homeless.”I think I have been loyal and given everything for 13 years,” he said. “At no point had I ever been questioned about my trustworthiness and I think I did the job absolutely to my full ability. “I think I did everything I could from my personal capabilities. I think I did everything professionally and correctly at the time with the information I had.”When things went wrong I tried to contact them to resolve it. Some of the issues were resolved, most weren’t. There was never any threat my job was going to be affected or on the line.”However, the Gottschalks said Mr Pyke had “breached their trust” and in a witness statement said he was not trustworthy or willing to help.Mrs Gottschalk told the judge: “There were a number of emails that the house wasn’t ready in terms of basic cleanliness and issues with the garden, despite having other employees to help Mr Pyke.”I don’t think that the role we presented was very difficult – looking after an empty house with occupants abroad.”The garden was looked after, he had two full-time employees on top of his role. I didn’t think that was too much to ask for anyone.”The couple raised a number of issues with the way Mr Pyke conducted himself, which they said led to his dismissal.Mrs Gottschalk said there were issues with “cleanliness in the house and his over familiarity”.She added: “We wanted him to be much more professional in his role. Overall complacency was spoken about.”However, Mr Pyke said Mrs Gottschalk had once told him he should describe himself as a “manny” on his CV because he was so good with the family’s children.”Manny is surely a play on words with the fact that I’m gay,” he said.Mrs Gottschalk responded: “That’s really clutching at straws, manny is a well-known term. That’s clearly clutching at straws.”It was a domestic environment I tried to make it as comfortable as possible, it was his behaviour in the house around us.” A housekeeper was sacked after falling out with a multi-millionaire couple who accused him of allowing his boyfriend to stay at their home without permission and driving their sports cars, a tribunal heard.Robin Pyke fell out with the lady of the house when she discovered his partner was staying at the £10million seven-bedroom mansion without her knowledge and that he was looking after someone else’s dog at the property while charging the owner £500 a week, the hearing was told.He was eventually sacked for being “over-familiar” and refusing to drive the banker Maximilian Gottschalk’s mother-in-law to Heathrow airport on his day off.An employment tribunal heard that Mr Pyke was a former gardener at the luxury home and was then appointed house manager when Mr Gottschalk and his company director wife, Jane, moved to Hong Kong, leaving their Henley-on-Thames home empty. I don’t think that the role we presented was very difficult – looking after an empty house with occupants abroadJane Gottschalklast_img read more

Tunisia beach massacre Report questioned security at Sousse hotel before terror attack

first_imgTunisian hotel gunman Seifeddine RezguiCredit:SITE Intelligence Group Some of the 38 people who died in the Tunisia terror attack Mr Ritchie asked whether the Foreign Office (FCO) travel advice warned tourists were a target for terrorists.She said: “It does say attacks happen in places visited by tourists. It does say there was a high risk of terrorism and foreigners may be at places that are targeted. I.e foreigners are potential targets.”However Mr Ritchie pointed out the advice in fact did not say tourists were targets. Tunisian hotel gunman Seifeddine Rezgui Tunisia attack victims’ relatives arrive at the Royal Courts of Justice for the inquestCredit:Nick Ansell/PA Relatives arrive at the Royal Courts of Justice in London, ahead of an inquest into the deaths of 30 Britons in the Tunisia beach terror attack Rezgui began his attack by firing on sun loungers arranged on the sands behind the hotel, before using the beach gate to enter its grounds and shoot down fleeing holidaymakers. Twenty people were shot dead on the beach, eight inside the hotel and another 10 in the hotel grounds.The shooting was the deadliest terrorist attack against Britons since the 2005 London Tube bombings.The inquest has already heard Tunisian official claims that local security forces “deliberately and unjustifiably” stalled their response to the attack.The court heard on Tuesday that in December 2014 Islamic State in Iraq and Levant (Isil) had released a video threatening attacks against Tunisia. Some of the 38 people who died in the Tunisia terror attack In March 2015, 21 people, mainly tourists, had been shot dead in an attack on the Bardo Museum in Tunis. The inquest was shown emails between a security consultant and travel operator TUI the day after the Bardo attack.In it the consultant said: “We had the video posted on YouTube by [Islamic State] as recently as December and they have vowed attacks on Tunisia as it works to establish its network there.”I would say this incident is the start of campaign within Tunisia.”Part of the video which was translated said: “We are going to expand to Tunisia whether you like it or not and we won’t be content until we have slaughtered the unbeliever.”Mr Ritchie QC put it to Jane Marriott, then a director of the Foreign Office Middle East desk, that in the Bardo attack tourists were a target.She said: “That is how it looked to us.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Making clear the families’s position, Mr Ritchie QC said: “I offer no criticism of the FCO for its decision not to embargo travel.”The families accept that it is a tricky decision and you can’t just embargo the whole world at the jerk of a knee. My criticism only goes as far as not putting that tourists were targets.”The inquest is expected to last for seven weeks. Foreign Office officials knew security at hotels in the Tunisian resort of Sousse was too weak to stop a terrorist attack months before a gunman shot dead 30 British holidaymakers, an inquest has heard.A reconnaissance of hotels by a Foreign Office official found there was little security in place to prevent or respond to an attack.The survey included the hotel where Seifeddine Rezgui would later go on a shooting rampage and focussed particularly on the security of beachfront entrances such as the one he would use during his assault.The Foreign Office then did not raise its threat level warning to tourists despite a deadly attack killing tourists in Tunis museum.Rezgui shot dead a total of 38 tourists in a marauding attack through the Imperial Marhaba hotel on June 26, 2015. The second day of an inquest into the deaths heard another Sousse hotel had been targeted by a suicide bomber in 2013, though the bomber only killed himself.Andrew Ritchie QC, representing the families of 20 of the dead, told the Royal Courts of Justice that a Foreign Office trade representative visited nine hotels in January 2015.The unnamed official had been in Mumbai during the 2008 attacks and went to Sousse to examine security and collect floorplans as part of a “contingency plan”.Mr Ritchie said: “Given that the attack on the Riadh Palms Hotel in October 2013 was launched from the beach, particular attention was paid to the beach access points.”It [the report] said ‘Despite some good security infrastructure around the hotels and resorts there seems to be little in the way of effective security to prevent or respond to an attack.”last_img read more

Five UK terror plots disrupted in past two months as MI5 battles

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The source said MI5 was managing around 500 active investigations, involving some 3,000 subjects of interest at any one time.The source said: “Abedi was one of a larger pool of former subjects of interest whose risk remained subject to review by MI5 and its partners.The source said where former subjects of interest seemed to show a risk of heading back into terrorism “MI5 can consider re-opening the investigation, but this process inevitably relies on difficult professional judgements based on partial information.”A terror attack in the UK is expected imminently after the threat level was raised to critical in the wake of Tuesday’s attack. The question of whether counter terrorism forces have enough funding or resources for the fight against terrorism is now likely to become a General Election issue.One former senior security figure said: “Knowing of someone’s radical sympathies and knowing they present a real and present danger are very different things.”So the essence of the security dilemma is triage, how to assess who and when to investigate very deeply given the resources needed for 24/7 surveillance. Armed British Transport Police Specialist Operations officers on board a Virgin train to Birmingham New Street at Euston station in London as armed police officers are patrolling on board trains nationwide for the first time The threat from battle-hardened jihadists returning from Iraq and Syria and the peril of online radicalisation are contributing to highest threat seen in decades by MI5. “For every suspect that appears to be high priority another has to be pushed down the list.”So who not to investigate urgently is as important a decision as who might be worth investigating.”Shashank Joshi, senior research fellow at security think tank the Royal United Services Institute, said: “It’s easy, with the benefit of hindsight, to argue that these warnings were opportunities to stop the bomber.”However, it’s also possible that these warnings were followed up, surveillance was conducted, and nothing was discovered.”Authorities cannot keep monitoring a suspect indefinitely, given limited resources.”There may however be questions over his travel to Libya, Germany, and perhaps Syria, and his ease of return to the UK afterwards.”It may point to weaknesses in the system of monitoring onward travel, especially as the number of UK nationals visiting Libya is likely to be fairly small.” Britain is dealing with an unprecedented terrorist threat which has seen MI5 and police disrupt five terror plots in the past two months alone, a senior Whitehall source has said.The threat from Islamist terrorists intent on committing attacks in the UK is so high that the security services are currently running 500 active investigations looking at some 3,000 potential suspects.Counter terrorism officials on Thursday sought to disclose the scale of the menace as MI5 and police faced accusations they had missed chances to stop the Manchester bomber when he was repeatedly flagged to authorities as a danger. Armed police are patrolling trains for the first time after the terror threat level was raisedCredit:PA A total of 18 plots have been wound up since 2013, including five in the two months since Khalid Masood killed four people during a car and knife rampage in Westminster. Family, friends and the local community are understood to have informed the authorities of the danger posed by Salman Abedi on at least five separate occasions before he blew himself up at a Manchester Arena pop concert killing 22 people.As the country remained on its highest terror alert for a decade, it was announced armed transport police would patrol trains for the first time.With the public urged to be vigilant, police were called to a string of incidents that turned out to be false alarms. Bomb squad officers were called to a school in Manchester, while Westminster Bridge and a shopping centre in Newport were both closed over fears of a suspicious car and Swansea Magistrates court was evacuated over a suspect package.last_img read more

Milkybars get milkier Nestle changes recipe of chocolate bars

first_imgNestle is reformulating the Milkybar to make milk the main ingredient in its latest effort to remove sugar from its products.The percentage of milk in the new recipe has increased from 26 per cent to 37.5 per cent, which allowed for the removal of sugar, Nestle said.The new products will remain free from artificial flavours, colours, preservatives and sweeteners.Newly designed packs, with the line “Milk is now our No 1 ingredient”, will appear across the full Milkybar range of bars, blocks, buttons and sharing bags and were to replace the existing products from May this year.Nestle said the reformulation would remove almost 350 tonnes of sugar and 130 million calories from UK public consumption, part of its pledge to remove 10 per cent of sugar from across its total confectionery portfolio by next year.It follows the recent launch of Nestle’s reformulated KitKat “Extra Milk and Cocoa”, which increased the percentage of milk by 20 per cent and cocoa by 13 per cent in the recipe. Fiona Kendrick, chairwoman and chief executive of Nestle UK and Ireland, said: “We want to make our products the best they can be for our consumers. We’ll take every opportunity to innovate and reformulate to improve our products but this can never be to the detriment of taste. “We have used our strength in research and innovation to develop a great recipe that replaces some sugar with more of the existing, natural ingredient that people know and love. We have added more milk to the recipe, which has been at the heart of Milkybar ever since it was launched in 1936.”What do you think? Join the debate by leaving a comment below.center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Muslim community lay flowers to pay respects to London Bridge attack victims

first_imgLondon’s Muslim community gathered to lay flowers in memory of those killed and injured in Saturday’s terror attack in London Bridge and Borough Market.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img

Jamie Oliver ruffles farmer feathers with chicken runin

first_imgHowever, Oliver and his friend Jimmy Doherty took the scheme to task on Channel Four during last week’s edition of Jamie and Jimmy’s Friday Night Feast. Over film of Red Tractor-reared chickens in a large shed, Doherty said: “Most of these birds never go outside and have little space to move about. Although some barns have natural light, perches and pecking objects this isn’t a requirement.” Michael Gove, the Environment secretary Michael Gove, the Environment Secretary, told farmers that food standards would not fall after Britain leaves the European UnionCredit: Andrew Parsons / i-Images Jamie Oliver, the celebrity chef, has risked opening a battle with Britain’s farmers after he said that he would refuse to eat chicken that has been produced to the “Red Tractor” standard.The restaurateur inflamed countryside opinion by giving his unvarnished opinion on “Red Tractor chicken” to viewers of his weekly cookery programme, saying “I personally would not feed it to my kids”.The comments came as Michael Gove, the Environment Secretary, told the National Farmers Union conference this week that food standards would not fall after Britain leaves the European Union.There are fears that after Brexit the UK will sign a trade deal with America to allow cheaper, chlorine-washed chicken to be sold in British supermarkets.Most chickens in the UK are reared to the Red Tractor standard, which the farming industry insists “means your chicken has met these robust and responsible production standards and is traceable back to independently inspected chicken farms in the UK”. The comments received short-shrift from farming leaders. Minette Batters, the president of the NFU, said the scheme “means that we have the highest standards of food safety of environmental protection. The Red Tractor is a mark of food safety.”She pointed out that the scheme helped families on lower incomes buy food confident that it had been created to a high standards. She said: “There are a lot of people on tight budgets and they must not be disadvantaged in all of this. It is about making sure we can provide quality affordable, safe, traceable food to everybody regardless of budgets, regardless of background.” Oliver added: “Chickens are bred to grow fast with a high ratio of meat to bone, but this makes them heavy so they can struggle to walk… I think people would be shocked by the reality of what we are buying.”Doherty asked: “You wouldn’t eat Red Tractor chicken?” Oliver replied: “I personally wouldn’t feed it to my kids.” Doherty then said: “The Red Tractor label does guarantee a consistent basic standard for welfare and hygiene so we know our food comes from a trustworthy and safe source.“But is that minimum standard high enough? If you look at Red Tractor, they deal with welfare but they deal with everything from pesticide use to conservation to health and safety to traceability so having a bottom standard that covers all of British farming for me is really important.”The pair then said that they would rather British chicken was produced to a “higher welfare” standard “with labels such as RSPCA-assured”.center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Minette Batters was this week elected president of the National Farmers’ Union Doherty’s criticism of the Red Tractor scheme marks an about turn. In 2013 he fronted an advert, saying: “Now more than ever it is important to know where all your meat comes from and I think the easiest way to do that is to trust the Tractor.”A spokesman for Doherty said: “Jimmy’s comments on Friday Night Feast clearly state that he believes the Red Tractor Label does guarantee a consistent, trustworthy and safe level of food welfare, traceability and hygiene in the UK. So he does not move from his previous position.“All industries in any sector require basic standards and regulations. That said, Jimmy also believes that these basic standards are just the foundation and should always be improved upon for the good of animal welfare.“That is exactly why Red Tractor already provide guidelines for higher welfare schemes such as free range and organic.” Minette Batters was this week elected president of the National Farmers’ UnionCredit: Mike Kemplast_img read more

Rise of consent apps as millennials sign digital contracts before they have

Lawyers have previously warned that consent apps cannot provide proof of consent, as feelings can change throughout an evening, and even in the moments before an act.There are also some privacy issues.  Many of these apps don’t require users to log in with their own identifiable information. Data is also stored in a cloud rather than on a phone, and other apps have access to billing information and the user’s contacts. He said: “This is not a legally binding contract.”This is like a digital handshake agreement. You talk about what you are agreeing to, and then you shake on it.”He is also reformulating the app, and wants to implement a panic button to be pressed at any time, which immediately withdraws any consent given.Another idea to improve the app is to add a state-of-mind test, like a maths question, to determine whether the person is drunk. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. However, it is unlikely these would carry much weight in court. In the world of romance post #MeToo, some young people are cautiously navigating their way through sexual relationships by using consent apps.These devices ask the user to confirm they consent to sexual activity with another user by tapping or writing on the screen of their smartphone.The number of such apps is growing, as they promise to provide a record about any agreement given for sexual activity, which goes into detail about which acts were and were not approved. This is supposedly set to be useful for disputes.Cody Swann, CEO of Gunner Technology, which owns consent app uConsent, told the Wall Street Journal that the app is meant for communication about sex, and two people must be in the same room for it to work. read more

Banks squeeze money out of customers signing up for free current accounts

The report found that a minority of customers shop around for better dealsCredit:Alamy Major banks are squeezing money out of customers who sign up for ‘free’ personal current accounts, the city watchdog has warned.The Financial Conduct Authority said consumers are foregoing money they could have received by getting a better deal elsewhere, and can end up paying more in charges than they could have paid if they had shopped around.This can include paying high overdraft fees, or even cutting interest rates for those who keep their accounts in credit, the FCA said, and helps to contribute to the profit of major banks It said that major banks have a “captive audience” of personal current account holders who also end up being cross-sold other products, such as credit cards and loans, due to their reluctance to swtich.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––Andrew Bailey, FCA chief executive, went as far as saying “there is no such thing as free banking”. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. In its progress report into a review designed to give it a greater understanding of retail banks’ business models, the FCA said major banks also have over 80 per cent of all personal current accounts, giving them  “considerable competitive advantages”.It said most current account customers contribute to their bank’s profits, but around 10 per cent of generate between a third and a half of all contributions to profits from current accounts. MPs demanded greater clarity on charges, with Tory MP Simon Clarke telling the Daily Mail: “Hopefully it will come as a wake-up call that banks need to take a more transparent approach.”Overdraft fees account for more than 30 per cent of the income banks get from current accounts, while over half (52 per cent) of personal current account customers took out a credit card with the same provider.Nearly half (48%) also went on to take out personal loans, and a third (32%) also had mortgages with their current account provider.Mr Bailey said: “This is an important piece of work to help us understand the complexities of the retail banking market and how this may develop in the future.”It provides more evidence that there is no such thing as free banking. It collected information from 45 firms to inform its review, including banks of a range of sizes, building societies, specialist lenders and new digital banks.The FCA is asking for responses to its update, including evidence or views, by September 7. The watchdog also said banks made £2.3billion a year from account-holders who slipped into the red. It provides more evidence that there is no such thing as free bankingAndrew Bailey, FCA chief executive “In particular, this evidence will inform the work we are doing on overdrafts, so we can fully understand the potential effects of the significant action we are considering taking in this market.”The FCA said developments such as changing customer behaviour, new technology and bank closures could lead to significant changes in the overall picture of the market. The report found that a minority of customers shop around for better deals read more

Police hunt black cab driver who dragged unconscious passenger from car and left

A taxi driver is being hunted by police after he was caught on camera dragging an unconscious passenger from the car and leaving him in the middle of the road.City of London Police have issued CCTV footage of the incident, which happened just after 6am on May 16.It shows a man being pulled from the back seat by his feet and hitting his head, before the driver gets back into the taxi and drives off.The man was found 15 minutes later by an off-duty police officer and the taxi reappeared shortly afterwards.Although the driver spoke to the officer, he did not mention the victim had been in his vehicle. CCTV captured the driver dragging the passenger into the streetCredit:Met Police Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. CCTV captured the driver dragging the passenger into the street The London Ambulance Service were called and the man was taken to hospital.Pc Christopher Hook, from the City of London Police, said: “We would like to speak to anyone who witnessed this incident in May.”To forcibly move a vulnerable person from your taxi and to leave them lying in the middle of the road is appalling and we need to find the man that did this.”If you have any information on this incident, please call us on 0207 601 2222 and quote the reference number 2403.” read more

St Lucia PM defends position on Citizenship by Investment Programme

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedSt Lucia PM dismisses UWI lecturer’s claim that businessmen as politicians are bad for societyAugust 16, 2017In “latest news”St Lucia to impose visa restrictions on VenezuelansAugust 15, 2017In “latest news”Allen Chastanet sworn in as new St Lucia PMJune 7, 2016In “latest news” (CMC) Prime Minister Allen Chastanet says he was “uncomfortable” with the wording of an opposition motion regarding the controversial Citizenship by Investment Programme (CIP).Prime Minister Allen Chastanet (Photo: CMC)The opposition legislators last week stormed out of the Parliament after the decision of the Speaker, Leonne Theodore-John, not to allow for the debate explaining that the motion would be deferred for a subsequent sitting of the Parliament.But she told legislators that she had written to the Member of Parliament for the Castries South constituency, Dr Ernest Hilaire on the issue.But an infuriated Hilaire complained that he only learnt of the change ‎when he arrived at the Parliament building last Tuesday and it was improper for a motion, which was circulated to members to be altered at short notice.Speaking at a news conference here on Monday, Prime Minister Chastanet told reporters with regards to the incident in the House last week, the Speaker was very clear.“At the right time the motion will come back before the House for debate, but from my perspective I don’t know how you debate a motion which is based on something that is not factual.“The wording of the motion in my mind was uncomfortable, it didn’t feel good going into the debate. Now those are things they want to bring up in the debate, they are free to bring it up in the debate but they can’t be written in a motion. The motion says whereas which suggests it is the fact.“There is no fact that suggests because we lower the price that the programme has jeopardised the reputation or undermined the security of this country,” Chastanet said.Chastanet told reporters that he would like to hear the positions of former prime ministers Dr Kenny Anthony and Professor Vaughan Lewis as to whether or not they support the position adopted by the opposition party on the CIP.Chastant said that he was surprised at the position adopted by the opposition St Lucia Labour Party (SLP) on the CIP when the programme was started under its administration.“The Labour Party is attempting to suggest that because we lowered the prices that somehow this is going to make the country less secure. None of the regulations as it pertains to background checks has been changed.“In fact if anything they have been strengthened by new relationships we have gained through the regional security forces. So I want to assure everybody that’s the case. So I don’t understand the arguments they are making,” he told reporters.Last week, following the walkout, Opposition Leader Phillip J Pierre told reporters that “we believe that the government simply does not wish any debate on the Citizenship by Investment Programme and has refused to provide any information on the CIP as required by law.“The SLP believes that this latest move by the government is testimony to the vindictiveness and undemocratic nature of the UWP (United Workers Party) government and its desire to stifle free speech,” Pierre said.“We intend to continue to show the people of St Lucia that this government is vindictive, is dictatorial, it abuses power. If it can do that after less than one year in office, we can imagine what can happen when they are in power for a longer period,” Pierre said.St Lucia is among several Caribbean countries that have introduced a CIP aimed at luring foreign investors to the region. Under the programme, the foreign investor is granted citizenship if he or she makes a substantial investment to the socio-economic development of the island. read more

Key Newcrest projects remain on schedule

first_imgThe year to end-June 2012 was one of significant investment in growth for Newcrest, with total capital expenditure in the year of A$2,556 million. Significant progress was made on advancing the company’s two major growth projects: as at June 30, 2012 the $1.3 billion Lihir Million Ounce Plant Upgrade (MOPU) was approximately 91% complete and the A$1.9 billion Cadia East project was approximately 80% complete.The company stated that the successful delivery of these two projects “underpins Newcrest’s future production growth profile” and that “both projects remain on schedule for completion (Lihir MOPU) and first commercial production (Cadia East) in the December 2012 quarter.” In addition, the Wafi-Golpu pre-feasibility study in PNG is nearing completion and, subject to joint venture partner approval, an updated ore reserve estimate is likely to be provided on 29 August 2012.Interestingly, the company detailed that corporate administration costs of A$140 million were A$47 million higher than the prior year and stated that a key driver of this increase was “higher expenditure on innovation and technology targeting the future generation of significant step change improvements in production.” The company also highlighted centralisation of operational control areas into designated hubs, an elevated spend on safety and health initiatives including major hazard management and higher IT system support costs following the investment in standard systems across the business, and increased investment in training and the group graduate programme.last_img read more

MacLean markets milestone 400th 900 Series Scissor Bolters at Vale T31D mine

first_imgThe commissioning of MacLean Engineering’s milestone 400th Series 900 Scissor Bolter was recently celebrated, with an underground ceremony at the Vale, Manitoba Operations – T3/1D nickel mine. “We’re proud of the MacLean bolter legacy, and are constantly pushing ourselves to come up with the next game changer in our industry,” noted MacLean Engineering President Kevin MacLean. “Safety and productivity remain the operational drivers for mines around the world, so we feel we have much to offer up the global mining industry, based on our nearly half-century of manufacturing solutions for the underground environment.”“MacLean Engineering is a company built on innovation partnerships, and there’s no better example of this kind of collaboration for underground safety and productivity than the delivery of our 400th Series 900 Scissor Bolter to the Vale, Manitoba Operations – T3/1D mine,” noted MacLean Engineering Founder and Chairman Don MacLean. “I want to thank Vale for believing in our manufacturing vision and product line over the years, and our employees for helping to build and sustain our unique approach to equipment manufacturing.”The MacLean scissor bolter technology was originally developed in 1984. Since that time, it has evolved and gone on to become a staple in the Canadian hard rock mining industry, one that is now increasingly exported to underground mining customers around the globe. The machine’s mobile platform for single-operator bolt and wire mesh installation provides application accuracy, speed, versatility, and, most importantly, greater safety protection as operators are always under protected ground.last_img read more