Epsons 3D glasses simulate 80inch screen

first_img © 2012 PhysOrg.com At tech events, wearable displays that have showcased in the form of high-tech visors and chunky spectacles or goggles seem to draw measured responses—impressive inventions for private media viewing at home or on the go but silly-looking or even evocative of special-recovery shades for postoperative elderly outpatients. We noticed at least one reference to “grandma glasses.” Epson’s Moverio BT-100 Wearable Display do not look exactly like designer sunglasses but they do have loaded features for gadget collectors who do not think $699.99 is an unthinkable price. Explore further Epson packs features into new Android HMD More information: www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/jsp/Moverio/Home.do According to reports, the glasses have pico projectors that are able to create a virtual experience of up to 80 inches’ display at a perceived distance of about 16 feet. According to Expert Reviews, the headset has a tiny pico projector built into each arm, pointing inwards towards an angled mirror in each lens, which projects the image in the center of the wearer’s vision. The dark outer visor is semi-transparent, letting the wearer see surroundings without being distracted by them. The device carries 1GB of built-in storage. Users access downloaded content via the microSDHC card slot (4GB card included) There is built-in WFi connectivity; a lithium rechargeable battery provides around six hours of continuous use. Built-in earbuds provide Dolby Mobile virtual surround sound. Of all the features, much appears to be made of the Android name in Epson product descriptions, as “Android-powered Moverio glasses.” The glasses connect to a control module; this Android 2.2-based handheld device lets the user select the content to view. Moverio is running on an Android 2.2 platform with Adobe Flash support. Epson publishes the kernel and an SDK, but the company is requiring developers to submit apps to them for consideration rather than going through an app store. The good news is that Epson is interested in seeing more new Android-based applications and side-by-side 3D content for its Moverio BT-100. To help support application and content development for Moverio BT-100, Epson is offering programs for developers residing in the United States.Meanwhile, Epson’s end-user vision is to see the product adopted not merely for personal entertainment use but also for business and professional ends. Epson America’s Anna Jen, director of New Business Development, said the Moverio BT-100 may play a role in virtual training platforms, 3D-CAD environments, and visualizing 3-D design renderings. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Epson America is now shipping Android-powered projector glasses that place your favorite videos, or games, literally in your face, Epson’s Moverio BT-100 wearable display glasses can simulate an 80-inch screen and deliver 3-D viewing. The Moverio BT-100 wearable display launched in Japan last November and is now available in the U.S. The device is on sale through Epson, resellers, or via Amazon. Citation: Epson’s 3-D glasses simulate 80-inch screen (2012, April 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-epson-d-glasses-simulate-inch.htmllast_img read more

Renewables can fill 80 percent electricity demand in US in 2050

first_imgTransformation of the Electric Sector (Phys.org) — In the United States, renewable energy sources could supply 80 percent of electricity demand in 2050 just by using technologies commercially available today. That is the word from a new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures). The report offers a detailed focus on the extent to which U.S. electricity needs can be supplied by renewable energy sources, including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, and wind. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further More information: www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/ Renewable energy costs falling: agency The lineup of renewable electricity technologies is discussed from a national perspective. The study’s overall position is that a future U.S. electricity system largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate “this clean generation pathway.“Reaching an 80 percent-renewables goal by 2050, says the study, will involve fifty percent of electricity coming from wind and photovoltaics. “The analysis treats a variety of scenarios with prescribed levels of renewable electricity generation in 2050, from 30% to 90%, with a focus on 80% (with nearly 50% from variable wind and solar photovoltaic generation).” A diverse mix of renewable energy resources, such as geothermal, solar, wind and wave energy, can support multiple combinations of renewable technologies. The results would be meaningful reductions in electric sector greenhouse gas emissions and water use. The study finds no geographical gaps in achieving the 2050 goal. “All regions of the United States could contribute substantial renewable electricity supply in 2050, consistent with their local renewable resource base.”Hydropower is the biggest renewable contributor, but hydropower plays less of a role over the next few decades. NREL suggests a growing role for offshore wind. NREL also says dedicated biomass power plants, as opposed to just feeding biomass to coal plants, are needed.The study is significant as the most comprehensive analysis of high-penetration renewable electricity of the United States to date. IEEE Spectrum comments that the study may also impact debates over renewable and their future. “The fossil fuel supporters who claim coal and natural gas will always be required to provide baseload power are standing on shakier ground all the time.”The study maintains that reaching the 80 percent goal is not insurmountable, but only if the right changes are made.”While this analysis suggests such a high renewable generation future is possible, a transformation of the electricity system would need to occur to make this future a reality. This transformation, involving every element of the grid, from system planning through operation, would need to ensure adequate planning and operating reserves, increased flexibility of the electric system, and expanded multi-state transmission infrastructure, and would likely rely on the development and adoption of technology advances, new operating procedures, evolved business models, and new market rules.” Citation: Renewables can fill 80 percent electricity demand in U.S. in 2050 (2012, June 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-renewables-percent-electricity-demand.html © 2012 Phys.Orglast_img read more

Researchers find evidence of hot spot that burned eastern underside of US

first_img © 2013 Phys.org Journal information: Nature Geoscience This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Hot spots are plumes of hot material that rise from deep within the Earth—sometimes, when encountering thin crust, they burst through forming volcanoes such as that which occurred with the Pacific Plate causing the formation of the Hawaiian Islands. Scientists believe that while tectonic plates move around, hot spots do not. Thus, plates sometimes move over the top of a hot spot. In the case of North America, the researchers believe that as the tectonic plate shifted to the west, its underside was burned from below by a hot spot—like a dinner plate passing over a candle. So great was the movement, it left the hot spot hiding beneath the Atlantic Ocean, where it persists to this day.To come to these conclusions, the researchers studied data from the earthquake that occurred back in 2011, centered in Virginia. Because seismic waves travel slower when moving through warmer rock, the researchers were able to discern that there lies a ridge of warm rock beneath the North American tectonic plate—evidence they say of burning left behind by the hot spot, as its depth is roughly equal to the depth of the bottom of the plate. The research data indicates that the scaring reaches from Missouri in the west towards Virginia in the east, then north-east through Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York and Massachusetts before appearing on the underside of the crust below the Atlantic Ocean.Prior research by other scientists has suggested that when a tectonic plate passes over a hot spot, and can’t burst through, the result is oftentimes diamond-bearing formations. In addition to studying seismic waves, the researchers also noted that there is a diamond-bearing formation over one part of the scarred segment—in Kentucky—further proof they say, that their assumptions about the hot spot are correct. More information: Hidden hotspot track beneath the eastern United States, Nature Geoscience (2013) DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1949AbstractHotspot tracks are thought to be the surface expressions of tectonic plates moving over upwelling mantle plumes, and are characterized by volcanic activity that is age progressive. At present, most hotspot tracks are observed on oceanic or thin continental lithosphere. For old, thick continental lithosphere, such as the eastern United States, hotspot tracks are mainly inferred from sporadic diamondiferous kimberlites putatively sourced from the deep mantle. Here we use seismic waveforms initiated by the 2011 Mw 5.6 Virginia earthquake, recorded by the seismic observation network USArray, to analyse the structure of the continental lithosphere in the eastern United States. We identify an unexpected linear seismic anomaly in the lower lithosphere that has both a reduced P-wave velocity and high attenuation, and which we interpret as a hotspot track. The anomaly extends eastwards, from Missouri to Virginia, cross-cutting the New Madrid rift system, and then bends northwards. It has no clear relationship with the surface geology, but crosses a 75-million-year-old kimberlite in Kentucky. We use geodynamical modelling to show that an upwelling thermal mantle plume that interacts with the base of continental lithosphere can produce the observed seismic anomaly. We suggest that the hotspot track could be responsible for late Mesozoic reactivation of the New Madrid rift system and seismicity of the eastern United States. Citation: Researchers find evidence of hot spot that burned eastern underside of US tectonic plate (2013, September 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-evidence-hot-eastern-underside-tectonic.htmlcenter_img This map shows 15 of the largest tectonic plates. Credit: USGS Explore further (Phys.org) —A combined team of researchers from the U.S. and China has found evidence of what they believe is burning on the underside of the North American tectonic plate. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes how they used data from a minor earthquake that occurred in the eastern part of the North America in 2011 to reveal hot spot activity below. New model of Earth’s interior reveals clues to hotspot volcanoeslast_img read more

Hacker modifies toy drone to hack and take over other toy drones

first_img(Phys.org) —Well known hacker Samy Kamkar has figured out a way to program a store-bought drone to take away control of other store-bought drones from their owners, and then to give the enslaved drones commands of its own. He calls the result SkyJack. Even more dramatically, he’s created a video describing how to do it so that others can create their own drone hackers, and has posted it all on his blog. Citation: Hacker modifies toy drone to hack and take over other toy drones (2013, December 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-hacker-toy-drone-hack-drones.html Samy Kamkar achieved fame by knocking MySpace offline in 2005 (and going to jail for it). After going straight, he was one of those people instrumental in exposing phone makers that were adding tracking capabilities to smartphones. In this latest endeavor, he’s added off-the-shelf hardware and Internet available code to a commercially sold drone—the quadcopter Parrot—to allow it to hack other Parrot drones.The concept is rather simple, he added a small single board computer (Raspberry Pi circuit board) that runs Linux, to his Parrot, installed some code and then added a little battery and two tiny wireless transmitters. Once airborne, the drone listens for a Wifi signal, if it hears one, it looks for a MAC address from a list it has, if a match is found, the device sends a disabling code, revoking control from the drone’s owner. Then his drone pretends it’s the rightful owner and starts sending control codes to the enslaved Parrot, directing its flight, and/or sending back images from its camera. More than anything, the SkyJack appears to be a stunt of sorts, coming on the heels of an announcement by Amazon that it plans to deliver packages via drones someday soon. The makers of Parrot will obviously be embarrassed by Kamkar ‘s work, but will undoubtedly add security features to them, preventing them from being skyjacked, which they probably should have done before selling them in the first place. His actions do however, highlight the increasing presence of drones in our lives and how those that make them need to be sure that they can’t be hacked, lest pizza’s or mail order socks in the future be delivered to the wrong address, or worse, fall prey to those wishing to create a fleet of enslaved roaming drones darkening our skies with menace. © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Amazon drone technology almost there, regulation nonexistent Explore furtherlast_img read more

Mysterious Siberian hole likely due to methane buildup and release

first_img Explore further What created this huge crater in Siberia? © 2014 Phys.org Last month reindeer herders in the Yamal Peninsula in Siberia came across a mysterious hole in the ground—after reporting what they’d discovered, a helicopter was dispatched and personnel aboard took snapshots of what was found. The photos have since gone viral on the Internet generating speculation about what caused the hole to come about—some suggested it was nothing more than a meteor crater or sinkhole, others seemed convinced it was part of an alien invasion, while others yet postulated that it was probably the remains of a collapsed pingo (a mound of earth covered ice). Now, after visiting the site of the first hole discovered, a team of researchers has concluded that the hole, and others like it that have been spotted, are most likely due to a sudden release of methane as permafrost melts. They note Siberia has experienced extremely warm summers the past two years.After sending a sensor down into the hole the researchers found an unusually high concentration of methane—9.6 percent, as compared to the normal 0.000179 percent. That finding and the fact that mounds of dirt near the mouth of hole indicate a blast of some sort occurred, has the researchers convinced that the warm summers caused permafrost melting which released underground methane. Gas pressure, they believe, built up to a tipping point, then was suddenly released, pushing out the material that had been sitting on top of it. Oddly, the depth of the hole is still not known. The researchers lowered a camera, but the line used was not long enough to allow for reaching the water (likely from melting permafrost) at the bottom. They estimate the depth to the water is approximately 70 meters. They would not even venture a guess as to the depth of the hole below the water.The researchers plan a return visit to the hole to conduct more research but aren’t confident of what they will find—they note that the walls are already collapsing and water movement can be heard, suggesting that whatever evidence exists now, might be gone by the time they return. This frame grab made Wednesday, July 16, 2014, shows a crater, discovered recently in the Yamal Peninsula, in Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Russia. Russian scientists said Thursday July 17, 2014 that they believe the 60-meter wide crater, discovered recently in far northern Siberia, could be the result of changing temperatures in the region. Andrei Plekhanov, a senior researcher at the Scientific Research Center of the Arctic, traveled on Wednesday to the crater. Plekhanov said 80 percent of the crater appeared to be made up of ice and that there were no traces of an explosion, eliminating the possibility that a meteorite had struck the region. (AP Photo/Associated Press Television) Citation: Mysterious Siberian hole likely due to methane buildup and release (2014, August 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-mysterious-siberian-hole-due-methane.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Mysterious Siberian crater attributed to methane, Nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature.2014.15649 (Phys.org) —A team of Russian researchers who visited the site of one of the mysterious holes that have appeared in the ground in parts of Siberia is theorizing that the likely cause is methane buildup and release, the journal Nature is reporting. Journal information: Naturelast_img read more