Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Tarantino love letter to movies has

first_imgOriginally published July 26.  10 best free movie and TV streaming services 2:38 Comments Tags Movie reviews Share your voice Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt in Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. Andrew Cooper/Sony Pictures Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film, is actually two stories. On the one hand, you have the odd couple of Leonardo DiCaprio’s Rick Dalton and Brad Pitt’s Cliff Booth. Dalton, an actor who’s seen better days, left his TV hit to make movies and has struggled ever since. Booth is his stunt double, driver, impromptu therapist and best friend. On the other hand, you have Dalton’s new neighbors: director Roman Polanski and his wife, actress Sharon Tate. Similar to what he did in Inglorious Basterds, Tarantino reinvents history here, imagining an alternate version of 1969 Hollywood in which Dalton lives next door to Tate on Cielo Drive, where the actress and three of her friends were famously murdered by the Charles Manson family.I was all in for the stylish homage to Hollywood’s golden age. I just wish it didn’t also have to be a horrific real crime with the full-on, blood-spattering Tarantino treatment. I should say up front that I’ve never been a Quentin Tarantino fan. I found both Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction violent and uncomfortable to watch. Watching Kill Bill: Vol. 1, I wanted to leave the theater because I was disgusted by all the blood and explicit acts of violence against women. I never bothered with Vol. 2. I’m among those who think Tarantino’s time may have passed and never understood why he was so revered. So I was ready to hate Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. In fact, I liked it, though I have some quibbles. Not the least of them is that at 161 minutes, the film would have benefitted from being shorter and tighter. Basically one movie instead of two. qt9-r-00318-01-rgbQuentin Tarantino, Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt on the set of Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. Andrew Cooper/Sony Pictures There’s already a lot going on in a film with two very strong leads. One (DiCaprio) is going through quite the midlife crisis. The other (Pitt) is just trying to scrape by. On top of that, you have an ensemble with so many famous names it’s hard to recall them all. We’re talking the likes of Al Pacino, Dakota Fanning, Kurt Russell, Luke Perry, Rumer Willis, Bruce Dern, Scoot McNairy and Lena Dunham.qt9-r-00061-rMargot Robbie in Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood Andrew Cooper/Sony Pictures With so many characters popping up, Margot Robbie doesn’t really have much to do as Sharon Tate other than stand there with perfect blond hair and exquisitely sculpted legs. She’s flawless throughout the whole movie, with one exception. In Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, Tarantino lets everyone know that even gorgeous women snore. Actress Margaret Qualley gets a similar superficial treatment. She plays Pussycat, a member of the Charles Manson family with a penchant for hitchhiking and flirting. She has a scene with Pitt’s character that is quite cringe-inducing. Not only because she looks like a teenager and he’s well into his fifties, but because at one point she offers him oral sex while he’s driving. But let’s talk more about what I liked in Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. Longtime Los Angeles institutions (and their neon lights) make an appearance: among them, restaurants Musso & Frank Grill and El Coyote, the landmark Capitol Records and theaters Cinerama Dome, Bruin and Pantages. center_img 77 Photos 2019 movies to geek out over Endless cameos and historic references will seduce any film and TV buff. Mike Moh plays a cocky version of Bruce Lee who says things like, “My hands are registered as lethal weapons.” Damian Lewis plays a blond-but-not-cool-enough Steve McQueen. Director Sergio Corbucci’s name is shown some reverence. There are countless references to spaghetti westerns (the title of the movie being one of them). People are glued to their TV sets to watch Three in the Attic, The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and The F.B.I. Our protagonists’ pasts are re-enacted as little flashback sequences perfectly interwoven into the action, and Tarantino has a lot of fun with the format, especially with Dalton, as we get a glimpse of his work as an actor but also how it could have been. One standout sequence shows the ending of The Great Escape with DiCaprio’s Dalton playing McQueen’s character in a way that made me want to watch The Great Escape for the umpteenth time. In another sequence, we see Dalton as a performer lashing out in the funniest way because he can’t remember his lines. Then there’s Pitt, whose cool Cliff Booth is arguably just as objectified as Robbie’s and Qualley’s characters. He has a shirtless sequence on top of a sunny roof where he doesn’t have any reason to be jealous of his very ripped and younger Fight Club self.There’s much more to say about Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood. The camera moves masterfully. The soundtrack is catchy. There’s some sort of shoe and foot fetish going on. A conversation between Dalton and a child actor is both hysterical and raw.Be sure to go see the movie the way the director intended you to see it: in 35mm. I just hope you’re luckier than me and your theater has more than one projector, like the charming little theater I saw it in has. Otherwise, prepare yourself for a pause every hour or so as they change reels. Or just take that opportunity to stretch your legs. Did I mention this is a 161-minute movie? Now playing: Watch this: TV and Movies 9last_img read more

UK parliament rejects Brexit deal

first_imgA handout photograph released by the UK Parliament shows Britain`s prime minister Theresa May (C) making a statement in the House of Commons in London on 15 January 2019 directly after MPs rejected the government`s Brexit deal. Photo: AFPBritain’s parliament on Tuesday resoundingly rejected prime minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal, triggering a no-confidence vote in her government and plunging its plans to leave the EU into further chaos.MPs voted 432 to 202 against May’s plan for taking Britain out of the European Union, the biggest parliamentary defeat for a government in modern British political history.With a deal that took nearly two years to craft in tatters and her government’s future hanging in the balance, EU leaders sounded a note of exasperation, urging Britain to come out and say what it actually wants.”If a deal is impossible, and no one wants no deal, then who will finally have the courage to say what the only positive solution is?” EU president Donald Tusk tweeted.Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission president, warned of a heightened risk of a “no deal” Brexit — an outcome that could disrupt trade, slow down the UK economy, and wreak havoc on the financial markets.The government of Ireland — the only EU member state with a land border with Britain — said it would now intensify preparations to cope with a “disorderly Brexit”.And German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz, representing the EU’s most dominant economy and leading political voice, called the vote “a bitter day for Europe”.’Catastrophic’ defeatMost lawmakers have always opposed Brexit, as have some leading members of the government, creating a contradiction that has been tearing apart Britain ever since a June 2016 referendum began its divorce from the other 27 EU states.Moments after Tuesday’s outcome, which was met with huge cheers by hundreds of anti-Brexit campaigners who watched the vote on big screens, opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn submitted a motion of no-confidence in May’s government, calling her defeat “catastrophic”.The vote is expected on Wednesday at 1900 GMT.May sought to strike a conciliatory tone, telling MPs they had the right to challenge her leadership and promising to hold more talks to salvage a workable solution by the rapidly approaching 29 March Brexit deadline.She promised to hold discussions with MPs from across parliament to identify ideas “that are genuinely negotiable and have sufficient support in this House”.”If these meetings yield such ideas, the government will then explore them with the European Union.”Downing Street said May will then return to parliament with a new Brexit proposal on Monday.’Political poker’With their nation again in turmoil, noisy supporters and opponents of Brexit, rallied outside the ancient parliament building in London.”It could end up being the day that will lead to us leaving with no deal!” said 25-year-old Simon Fisher, who backs a swift and sharp break with the EU.A much larger rally nearby in support of a second referendum turned Parliament Square, dotted with statues of past UK leaders, into a sea of EU flags.Economists said the scale of May’s defeat — on the upper end of most predictions — now also put pressure on Brussels to make more meaningful compromises.The pound surged higher against the dollar and euro after the vote, seemingly buoyed by May’s promise to seek a compromise with her opponents.”Markets project beliefs and the underlying belief is that nobody’s going to be committing economic suicide,” BK Asset Management’s Boris Schlossberg said.But businesses voiced alarm about the outcome, which does nothing to resolve uncertainty that has been dampening the UK investment climate for months.”Financial stability must not be jeopardised in a game of high-stakes political poker,” warned Catherine McGuinness, policy chair at the City of London Corporation, the body governing the British capital’s massive financial district.’Warm words not enough’May made it her mission to carry out the wishes of voters after she became prime minister a month after the referendum, putting aside her own initial misgivings and stating repeatedly that “Brexit means Brexit”.But her deal raised concern that Britain could end up locked in an unfavourable trading relationship with the EU.Criticism of the deal was focused on an arrangement to keep open the border with Ireland by aligning Britain with some EU trade rules, if and until London and Brussels sign a new economic partnership — a tortuous process that could take several years.Arlene Foster, head of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party upon which May relies for her parliamentary majority, said May needed to win binding concessions from Brussels to secure her vote.”Reassurances whether in the form of letters or warm words, will not be enough,” said Foster.”The prime minister must now go back to the European Union and seek fundamental change to the Withdrawal Agreement.”Speculation is growing on both sides of the Channel that May could ask to delay Britain’s divorce from the EU after almost half a century of membership.But a diplomatic source told AFP any extension would not be possible beyond 30 June, when the new European Parliament will be formed.last_img

Finnish telco Elisa is using technology from OTT p

first_imgFinnish telco Elisa is using technology from OTT platform provider Tvinci to power its on-demand service EpicTV.EpicTV will use Tvinci’s OTT 2.0 platform to enable its pan-European subscriber base to watch sports programming and movies in HD quality via iPads.The free EpicTV iPad app gives consumers access to 600 movies based on adventure sports. Users can download content onto their devices to watch offline. 
“In an age where convenience is valued so highly and where consumers are averse to relying on traditional programming schedules, our latest deployment with Elisa has answered their immediate need not only for a new OTT video delivery method to iPad, but also a brand new TV experience,” said Ido Wiesenberg, Tvinci’s co-founder and vice-president business development.last_img read more